SEMINARS & WORKSHOPS in AUTUMN 2016 and SPRING 2017
The Web of Shame in the Therapeutic Space A one day seminar with Christiane Sanderson London, 3 December 2016, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm As practitioners, we often witness that shame can become chronic or even toxic, having a crippling effect on our clients, especially those who carry the burden of intergenerational shame and are raised in shame prone families, or who have histories of abandonment, prolonged or systematic emotional, physical or sexual abuse, neglect or exposure to domestic violence. Our therapeutic interactions can be even more complicated if there exists practitioner shame that we are either not aware of, or haven’t fully addressed. At this practical and unique seminar which would be relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, across modalities, Christiane draws on her extensive experience in working with survivors of childhood sexual abuse to examine the complex nature of shame, its origins, its functions and its long term effects, to explain how we can: distinguish between healthy and chronic shame, shame and guilt – while looking at their relationships to hubristic and authentic pride assist our clients through the process of defences against shame – these defences could be manifest as withdrawal, attacking self, avoidance and attacking others and bear linkages to self-harm, addictions, repugnant obsessions, perfectionism, narcissism, grandiosity, rage and violence identify our own patterns of shame and the impact these might be having on our therapeutic relationships build shame resilience for clients and ourselves through specific therapeutic techniques Through experiential exercises, case vignettes and emphasis on creative, right brain based exercises such as the embodiment of shame, unpeeling the masks of shame, use of nesting dolls, re-apportioning shame and compassion focused exercises; the seminar allows us to promote healing, restore authentic pride and build shame resilience, while minimising the risk of re-shaming our clients. further details & bookings
Countertransference - working with parents who present challenges An online webinar with A/Prof Frances Thomson-Salo 12 January 2017, Thursday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time Working with parents of young infants can be an emotionally turbulent experience for practitioners. Greater awareness of the strength of these emotional responses however, can facilitate our understanding and effective containment of the feelings aroused – thus allowing for more effective therapeutic interventions. As therapists, our emotional responses can be manifold: We may unwittingly distance ourselves from our clients We may inadvertently be conveying a subtly denigrating response Or we may no longer be doing our best work because of the confusion or danger which we may feel when working with troubled families Such responses may trigger indifference, anger or hate in our therapeutic relationships, leaving us with the hopeless feeling that we have nothing to offer our clients. Exploring these responses however, in reflective supervision, facilitates a more nuanced therapeutic intervention with parents without overreacting in perhaps unnecessarily precipitate or inappropriate ways. At this online seminar, which would be relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists and counsellors across modalities, A/Prof Frances Thomson-Salo draws on her extensive experience to help us examine: the difference between a therapist’s personal language and the professional discourse required to frame these feelings defenses such as splitting and the relevant clinical guidelines for these defense strategies Through clinical examples and case studies, the webinar explores how we can tap into the potential strengths of our emotional responses and the implications this has for our therapeutic practices. further details & bookings
Time-limited & Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with Children, Parents and Young People An Interactive Approach A one day workshop with Dr Ruth Schmidt Neven London, 27 January 2017, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm Designed to be of practical value to psychotherapists, psychologists, psychiatrists and family mental health practitioners, this workshop by Dr Ruth Schmidt Neven coincides with the publication of her latest book Time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy with children and adolescents: An interactive approach (Routledge Press). At a time when there is increasing concern about the escalation of child and adolescent mental health problems, this workshop provides an innovative, contextual, therapeutic model that engages the child, the young person and their parents. The model is based on evidence that the most enduring therapeutic outcomes involve not only a shift or change in the young person, but also a shift in the parents’ perspective of themselves. The behaviour of the young person is therefore not perceived in limiting pathological terms but rather as an opportunity for us to understand how young people ‘speak’ their family and emotional experiences. At the core of the model is the recognition that dynamic capacity for growth and change in the child and young person by itself creates opportunities for effective therapeutic engagement. The workshop is not intended to provide a manualised programme but rather to describe a set of core principles and a conceptual framework for the practice of time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy. These principles include: the recognition of the primacy of the core developmental task for children and adolescents the need to attend simultaneously to the four interconnected domains of the intra-psychic, the interpersonal, the systemic and the environmental in the therapeutic process This broader approach enables us to encompass the ‘total field’ that surrounds the child, young person and their parents thereby promoting positive change within a relatively short period of time. Through illustrative case vignettes and examples from her clinical work in UK & Australia, Dr Ruth Schmidt Neven helps both new practitioners and those with many years of experience to comprehend a time limited framework, enabling us to: gain insight into how a psychodynamic approach can provide effective results apply the core principles in a practical manner to our clinical work further details & bookings
Resolving Clinical Dilemmas in Therapy A one day seminar with Susie Orbach London, 28 January 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm As practising therapists and counsellors, we witness a plethora of clinical dilemmas on an ongoing basis – what should be the focus of our first session? How do we deal with erotic transference, perplexing and conflicting client behaviour and the challenges that come with client dyads? We rely on process notes to reproduce narratives of our client sessions and yet realise that sessions are so much more than words. They are the pauses, the hesitations, the breadths, the felt misunderstandings, the projections that occur which may be wordless but are nevertheless palpable and powerful. In addition, there are the internal ruminations of the therapist, both the theoretical and the countertransferential: what are we thinking now, what are we feeling now, what sense do we make of the utterances between the people in the room. These regular dilemmas are made even more challenging given the fact that our intended interventions may have multiple, and indeed co-existent objectives – our words may be directed at facilitating the client’s narrative or at slowing down the narrative and assisting our client in her thought process. At this intellectually stimulating and practical seminar, Susie Orbach relies on a psychoanalytic and developmental approach and draws on therapeutic case examples to help us closely examine the challenging facets of our client interactions. The aim of the seminar is to get as close to the experience of a therapy session as possible. To facilitate the process at the seminar, we will hear excerpts from the two recent Radio 4 series In Therapy which span a variety of clinical situations. We will then dissect parts of the sessions to understand what was said by the therapist and why. Susie will also facilitate similar dissection of clinical material brought by participants with a view to elucidating the crucial aspects of our interventions that make these effective. She explains the best practices that therapists employ to overcome these commonly occurring dilemmas while providing interventions that: focus on affect and examine the complexity of feelings our clients may be experiencing challenge our client’s conceptions of events when these appear out of kilter with the inner world effectively get behind defence structures further details & bookings
Eventbrite - Resolving Clinical Dilemmas in Therapy
Attachment, Interest Sharing and the personally created External Environment A one day workshop with Dr Una McCluskey London, 4 February 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm Attachment Theory, as interpreted by Dorothy Heard and Brian Lake, and operationalised and researched by Dr Una McCluskey, explains a dynamic connection between the original attachment systems identified by Bowlby - careseeking and caregiving - and the biological systems of self-defence, sexuality, interests and the personally created external environment. At this practical workshop, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists, and counsellors, Dr Una McCluskey draws on her internationally recognised, attachment-based therapeutic models to address the often neglected areas of interests, interest-sharing with peers and the personally created external environment (our home, its location and organisation). Most of our time as therapists is taken up with a person’s internal environment and the impact of earlier experience on current relationships at home and in the workplace. However, we can sometimes fail to address a person’s interests or the absence of interests in their lives or indeed pay any attention to whether the home that they have created for themselves is supportive or unsupportive of their wellbeing. The workshop offers us an opportunity to acquaint ourselves with the Theory of Attachment-Based Exploratory Interest Sharing (TABEIS) and the concepts of Goal-Corrected Empathic Attunement (GCEA). Through illustrative video vignettes and case examples, the workshop highlights how we can effectively utilise vitality affects instead of theoretical interpretations and how the implications of TABEIS can find effective use in our therapeutic interactions. further details & bookings
Parenting and Personality Dysfunction: clinical implications A one day workshop with Dr Gwen Adshead London, 10 February 2017, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm The ‘orchid-dandelion’ hypothesis of child development (Ellis, 2008) suggests that there are some ‘environments’ that can damage even the most resilient children. Parental harshness, chronic hostility and a rejecting stance might form part of such hazardous environments – the incidence of which may be more common in parents with personality disorders. Evidence shows that such ‘maladaptive parental behaviour’ is not just associated with high rates of child and adolescent psychopathology; but also with higher manifestations of conduct and / or oppositional defiant disorders in children. As therapists, we also realise that parental personality dysfunctions can have attachment implications. Frightened or frightening parenting behaviours lead to disorganised attachment in children, which in turn is symptomatic of a range of abnormal childhood behaviours. Our challenge in working with such parents and families however, is that abusive parents with personality disorders are often hard to engage. They may feel defensive and reluctant to building a trusting relationship over time with therapists. At this practical and therapeutically oriented seminar which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Dr Adshead draws on her extensive clinical experience, recent neurobiological findings and relational thought to help us comprehend: How personality disorders (across the three DSM-5 clusters) affect the interpersonal function and can be viewed as relational disorders Core parenting skills that create attuned sensitivity (and hence, secure attachment patterns) and how these can be negatively impacted through personality dysfunctions The links between personality disorders and high-risk states of mind The evidence that shows the risk to child development, both in terms of genetic vulnerability and environmental stress factors Clinical interventions for parents with personality disorders Maintaining the view that therapeutic interventions for parents with personality disorders are both effective and preventive, Dr Adshead explains how therapists can apply these learnings in clinical settings and allow for provision of relational security at multiple levels. further details & bookings
Early Relational Trauma and Borderline States of Mind A one day workshop with Marcus West London, 11 February 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 5:00pm At this practical workshop, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, we aim to understand the underlying dynamics of our clients’ apparently destructive and entrenched ways of relating and affective-somatic responses; with a view to enhancing our therapeutic efficacy when working with borderline states of mind. The workshop draws on recent advances in infant development theory, attachment theory, trauma theory, relational and analytic theories to explore how early relational trauma underlies, structures and becomes embodied in the personality. We explore: the patterns associated with early relational trauma and how these emerge in the consulting room how we can, as therapists, look beyond ill-adaptive behavioural patterns and unravel the complex and conflicted nature of what is being expressed how we can recognize and work with the foundational, traumatic experiences of our clients how we can comprehend nihilism, shame, suicidality, anxiety, regression and murderousness within the context of early relational trauma The workshop explores how therapists can be deeply affected by, and drawn into, the dynamics related to relational trauma, and how our own personalities and attitudes play a significant role in the unfolding therapy. Specifically, we explore the kinds of conflicts that can lead to impasse and how these can be worked through by exploring and developing our own primitive reactions, while working within the frame of early relational trauma. The workshop helps us understand: The clinical reasons that have led to trauma becoming sidelined and/or lost in analytic thinking The link between early relational trauma and narcissistic and borderline states of mind The effect of trauma on the psyche-soma: primitive defensive responses, dissociation, the disruption of ego-functioning, and complex PTSD - from Janet, Winnicott and Fonagy to van der Kolk, Shapiro (EMDR), and Porges (Polyvagal theory) The dynamics of the traumatic complex - the key to understanding and working with early relational trauma and borderline states of mind Borderline conflicts and the disruption of identity and ego-functioning - reconsidering the ‘ego-destructive superego’ in the light of trauma Re-construction, co-construction and re-enactment - from Janet to intersubjectivity theory, Bromberg, and the Boston Change Process Study Group Dissociation, regression and negative therapeutic reaction Working with what is unbearable - re-traumatisation, idealisation and the window of tolerance The fight, flight, freeze, collapse responses in relation to anxiety, shame, regression, suicidality and murderousness Accompanying the client 'into the darkest places' - Tronick's dyadically expanded states of consciousness and the therapist’s journey further details & bookings
The Web of Shame in the Therapeutic Space A one day seminar with Christiane Sanderson Dublin,11 February 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm As practitioners, we often witness that shame can become chronic or even toxic, having a crippling effect on our clients, especially those who carry the burden of intergenerational shame and are raised in shame prone families, or who have histories of abandonment, prolonged or systematic emotional, physical or sexual abuse, neglect or exposure to domestic violence. Our therapeutic interactions can be even more complicated if there exists practitioner shame that we are either not aware of, or haven’t fully addressed. At this practical and unique seminar which would be relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, across modalities, Christiane draws on her extensive experience in working with survivors of childhood sexual abuse to examine the complex nature of shame, its origins, its functions and its long term effects, to explain how we can: distinguish between healthy and chronic shame, shame and guilt – while looking at their relationships to hubristic and authentic pride assist our clients through the process of defences against shame – these defences could be manifest as withdrawal, attacking self, avoidance and attacking others and bear linkages to self-harm, addictions, repugnant obsessions, perfectionism, narcissism, grandiosity, rage and violence identify our own patterns of shame and the impact these might be having on our therapeutic relationships build shame resilience for clients and ourselves through specific therapeutic techniques Through experiential exercises, case vignettes and emphasis on creative, right brain based exercises such as the embodiment of shame, unpeeling the masks of shame, use of nesting dolls, re-apportioning shame and compassion focused exercises; the seminar allows us to promote healing, restore authentic pride and build shame resilience, while minimising the risk of re-shaming our clients. further details & bookings
Working with Adolescents: Separation from Parental Figures & the Ending of Therapeutic Relationships A one day training workshop with workshop with Professor Stephen Briggs London, 25 February 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 5:00pm Working with the emotional and relational aspects of the separation process is central to therapeutic work with young people and their families. This workshop explores how an understanding of the separation process can helpfully inform therapeutic work; while highlighting how the ending of therapeutic relationships represents a significant experience of separation – and potentially of growth - for young people. At this practical and therapeutically oriented workshop which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists, student counsellors and psychiatrists, Professor Briggs draws on his long-standing psychodynamic and clinical experience to explore the specific challenges we encounter as therapists when working with the separation process. The workshop explains how we can: negotiate the experiences of loss, and defences against the pain of loss comprehend adolescents’ difficulties in becoming more separate from parents, and the emotional and developmental problems that can ensue appreciate the complex and demanding situations where parents have difficulties in relating to adolescent emotionality work with the emotional aspects of ending therapeutic relationships with young people comprehend the impact of social media and the changing nature of transition to adulthood – and apply this in therapeutic interactions with young people Overall, the workshop highlights how we can identify the positive developmental aspects of parental separation and allow this to inform our therapeutic work with young people. The workshop also explains how we can effectively manage the process of ending therapeutic relationships – a necessary stage which, though emotionally exacting for both therapist and young person, can significantly help a young person’s development. further details & bookings

nscience UK is an independent organisation that seeks to explore the interdisciplinary richness of mental health disciplines. Through a series of seminars, workshops and conferences that are conducted throughout the year, we aim to present the latest advances in theory and research to practitioners; with a view to furthering their continuing professional development.

Disclaimer: Individuals pictured are either conference speakers or models. All images are used for illustrative purposes only.

Loading

Continuing professional development through seminars, workshops and conferences for psychotherapists, counsellors and psychologists.