SEMINARS & WORKSHOPS in 2017 / 18
The Growth-Promoting Role of Mutual Regressions in Deep Psychotherapy Master Class with Dr Allan Schore London, 23 September 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 5:00pm Dr Allan Schore’s ground-breaking work on enactments, mutual regressions, and deep psychotherapy has influenced recent neuropsychoanalytic theory and research, and informed therapeutic work of practitioners around the world. At this new workshop, in which Dr Schore draws on his next two Norton volumes, Right Brain Psychotherapy and The Development of the Unconscious Mind – he elucidates and explains his ongoing work on the mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change that operate at implicit levels of the therapeutic alliance, beneath the exchanges of language, explicit cognitions, and voluntary behaviour. The workshop cites neurobiological research which highlights that the creative therapist’s interpersonal skill in empathically resonating with and regulating the client’s conscious and especially unconscious affective communications is central to facilitating structural changes and promoting growth. Such neuroplastic changes are vital for adaptive progressions of the client’s right brain emotion processing, relational, and stress regulating systems. In line with the current two-person relational trend in psychotherapy, Dr Schore explains that such interpersonal neurobiological mechanisms occur in heightened affective moments of clinical regressions – defined as the process of returning to an earlier stage of development, a place of origin. Although the paradoxical process of regression may reflect a clinical deterioration, it may also represent a creative return to fundamentals and origins that can facilitate a potential reorganization; leading to better integration, healthy individuation, and increases in the adaptive capacities of play and intimacy. Citing from his forthcoming books and using clinical case examples, Dr Schore presents neuropsychoanalytic models that differentiate spontaneous regressions in enactments of attachment trauma from controlled mutually synchronized regressions at different stages of therapy. He argues that the concept of regression, banished by the end of the last century, needs to return to the therapeutic domain. further details & bookings
Affect Regulation Theory: Clinical Applications A 2-day interactive training workshop with Dr Allan Schore Dublin, 25 & 26 September 2017, Monday and Tuesday 9:30am - 5:00pm on both days At this interactive training workshop over 2 days, Dr Schore describes his ongoing work on Affect Regulation Theory, an evidence-based interpersonal neurobiological model of development, psychopathogenesis, and treatment of the early forming emotional core of the right brain subjective self. Of particular relevance to psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, the workshop uses a series of PowerPoint lectures, audience dialogues and examples of early Attachment Trauma; together with essential themes from Dr Schore’s latest book, The Science of the Art of Psychotherapy to elucidate how, as therapists, we can: focus on our own right brain functions so we can effectively process and regulate our client’s unconsciously communicated bodily-based affective states gain a deeper comprehension of regulated enactments and allow these to inform our therapeutic approaches interpret recent neurobiological data – that allows us to enhance our therapeutic creativity and understand data from neuroscience, developmental psychology, pediatrics, endocrinology, and psychiatry that explains gender differences in brain and developmental psychopathology Overall, the workshop focusses on the pragmatic clinical applications of Affect Regulation Theory, with specific attention to the psychoneurobiological change mechanisms embedded in the psychotherapy relationship. About the speaker Dr Allan Schore is on the clinical faculty of the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine. He is author of four seminal volumes, most recently The Science of the Art of Psychotherapy, as well as numerous articles and chapters. His contributions appear in multiple disciplines, including neuroscience, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, developmental psychology, infant mental health, attachment theory, trauma studies, behavioral biology, clinical psychology, and clinical social work. He is past editor of the Norton series on Interpersonal Neurobiology and a reviewer or on the editorial staff of 45 journals across a number of scientific and clinical disciplines. He has received a number of honors for his work, including an Award for Outstanding Contributions to Practice in Trauma Psychology from the Division of Trauma Psychology and the Scientific Award from the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association, Honorary Membership by the American Psychoanalytic Association, and the Reiss-Davis Child Study Center Award for outstanding contributions to Child and Adolescent Mental Health. He has had a private psychotherapy practice for over four decades. further details & bookings
Attachment Informed Therapy for Personality Disorders A 2-day training workshop at London with Dr Gwen Adshead London, 29 & 30 September 2017, Friday & Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm on both days Personality Disorders (PD), when viewed as social manifestations of pathological processes, can present clearly identifiable developmental disturbances. Across the spectrum clusters identified by DSM-IV and V, we can identify dysregulations of arousal, affect, stress-response and interpersonal attachment patterns. These dysregulations manifest in pervasive, maladaptive patterns of interpersonal behaviour, extreme difficulties of cognition and affect regulation, and diminished levels of impulse control – all of which translate into an extremely challenging therapeutic journey. Not all ‘treatment’ choices have demonstrable efficacies. It takes learned skills for therapists to correctly identify, diagnose and work therapeutically with personality disorders. As therapists, we could benefit from a deeper understanding of personality disorders (across the spectrum) that allows us to comprehend the neurobiology of personality, the role of attachment and trauma in the development of PD, the impact of PD on the trauma narrative, the linkage of attachment classifications with PD sub-types and evidence-based therapies for PD. At this therapeutically oriented workshop, Dr Adshead relies on an attachment-informed approach, while drawing on her long-standing clinical expertise to help us comprehend personality disorders in a structured and methodical manner. Over 4 modules and 2 days, the workshop helps us understand the aetiology and psychopathology of personality disorders (Day 1) and relevant therapeutic approaches (Day 2). The workshop starts by looking at the key features of ICD-11 and DSM classifications and draws distinctions between: Schizoid, paranoid and schizotypal dysfunctions Antisocial, narcissistic and borderline dysfunctions and Avoidant, dependent and obsessive-compulsive behaviours We rely on both neurobiological and attachment theory for our discussions and especially consider the role of adverse childhood experience and trauma. We look at the disavowal process of distress and the failure of mentalisation. We identify the social attachment manifestations of each cluster and consider its developmental causalities. Through case-vignettes and discussions, we consider Arousal, Affect, Cognition, Somatic self-identity, psychological self-identity and the possible manifestations we see in clients, including: Substance misuse and dependence Unstable relationships Vexatious social interactions Deceptive behaviour Attacks on attachment figures Self-harming and suicidal behaviours On Day 2, we start looking at therapeutic options available to us, as therapists. We consider the controversies around ‘treatability’ of PD and understand how our approach should include considerations for: The nature and severity of pathology The impact on function and somatic manifestations Comorbid conditions and risk factors The timing of interventions and Cultural considerations We look at the linguistic markers of attachment security, coherence of narrative; agency, idealization and meta-cognition; reflective function and the experience of negative affects – so as to be able to consider different therapeutic techniques for different aspects of personality dysfunction. We compare and contrast the evidence base for different kinds of therapies including: Dynamic psychotherapies Cognitive therapies Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) Mixed therapeutic approaches With specific attention to attachment-informed therapeutic approaches that have proven efficacies for PD. Overall, the 2-day course uses theoretical discussions and case vignettes to explain an attachment-informed psychological approach to personality and its disorders; with the aim of helping therapists become more confident in their therapeutic engagement with PD clients. further details & bookings
Safe Trauma Therapy: Accurately Gauge and Modulate Arousal Level – In Clients and Yourself A one day seminar with Babette Rothschild, author of The Body Remembers, Volumes 1 & 2 Video Recordings now Available In her newest book, The Body Remembers, Volume 2, Revolutionizing Trauma Treatment (WW Norton, 2017), Babette Rothschild presents, among other topics, an updated and integrated view of the Autonomic Nervous System that includes a new, innovative tool for more precise observation and modulation of arousal states. At the start of Chapter 2 she writes: Three or so decades ago, one of my clients, Greta, after much preparation, was ready, we agreed, to process memories of a very traumatic childhood incident. This was the first time she had wanted to talk about it and I was interested. Too interested. We both became so engrossed in her account that it was only when she was finished that either of us realized something had gone terribly wrong. Rather than feeling better from the telling, she was extremely anxious and so stiff she could barely move. During the next week she was plagued with panic attacks and called me multiple times for support and stabilization. For her, what should have been an exciting progression in her therapy backfired into regression. In another situation, a new client, Hans, easily answered all of the usual intake and assessment questions and told me he was, “fine.” Nonetheless, when he left my office he became very confused and lost his way several times on his familiar route home. He was so distressed that he cancelled the next appointment we had scheduled and never returned. Could I have prevented these therapeutic disasters? Babette goes on to lament that a more nuanced understanding of the ANS could have spared suffering … … I would have noticed as Greta’s facial expression gradually lost its animation, her respiration quickened, and her skin tone slowly blanched. Those observations would have led me to slowing down or stopping her narrative, putting on the brakes, to reduce arousal and stabilize before she went on. It might even have meant pacing her memory processing in a different way, taking it slower and in smaller pieces. Likewise, with the necessary information and greater understanding, I might have seen that Hans was not “fine,” that his pupils were dilating, I could have enquired about the temperature of his hands and feet, and I may have noticed as his posture became more collapsed. Such experiences and reflections led to the theory and tools that form the basis for this seminar … … [they] peaked my interest in passing on what I learned about making trauma treatment safer through observation and modulation of the ANS…I aim to give trauma therapists a new and improved tool that they can use to gauge and monitor their client’s—and their own –level of autonomic arousal at any given moment in time. By doing so, therapists will always be in the position to know whether their clients are able to safely manage what is happening and if they are able to integrate what is being worked on in therapy. Likewise, the therapist will also know if she, herself, is able to think clearly despite the level of stress in herself and her client. At this practical and unique seminar, which would be particularly relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists, body psychotherapists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Babette Rothschild draws on her longstanding experience to explain both traditional and more recent theories of ANS organization, including those of Stephen Porges. The result is an integrated, cohesive understanding that is more precise and easier to monitor, leading to trauma therapy that is much more safe for both client and therapist. further details & bookings
Attachment as a Relational Construct A one day workshop with Dr Ruth Schmidt Neven London, 6 October 2017, Friday 10:00am - 4:30pm Designed to be of practical value to psychotherapists, psychologists, psychiatrists and family mental health practitioners, this workshop by Dr Ruth Schmidt Neven takes a unique look at Attachment – linking it to developmental stages throughout the life cycle of our clients and identifying how therapists can have a positive impact on cognitive processes. The workshop helps us comprehend how attachment as a relational construct expands over the lifespan and provides continuity between early childhood experiences, later development and adult life. The workshop starts by recognising that all behaviour has meaning, and is a communication. Within this context, positive infant-parent relationships have a transforming function that create the potential for mutuality, reciprocity and shared meaning, and thereby provide a continuing protective system through to adulthood. The absence of a ‘secure base’ and an ‘internal working model’ has an impact on: how children ‘speak’ their family through their behaviour, and how adults ‘speak’ their childhoods in the consulting room The workshop looks closely at the therapeutic challenges we face as practitioners when there is a breakdown in the attachment process. How do we link this and therapeutically address cognitive functioning, brain development and the perpetuation of trauma for the developing child? Through illustrative case vignettes, a video presentation and examples from her clinical work in UK & Australia, Dr Ruth Schmidt Neven helps both new practitioners and those with many years of experience to view Attachment in a relational and developmental perspective, bringing to life the opportunities we have in our therapeutic interactions. By the end of the workshop participants will: Gain familiarity with the conceptual framework of attachment which emphasises the interdependence of systems with respect to developmental imperatives, relational and meaning making interactions between and infant and caregiver, and what Bowlby has referred to ‘evolutionary adaptedness’ Have an understanding of some of the evidence base of attachment in particular - The Strange Situation Test and the Adult Attachment Interview Examine the role of attachment in promoting regulatory behaviour in the infant and young child, specifically with respect to developing opportunities for higher levels of cognitive processing, the acquisition of empathy and the controlling and balancing of emotions Gain insight into using an attachment and meaning making model in clinical work with children, parents and young people further details & bookings
Working with Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse A one day seminar with Christiane Sanderson London, 7 October 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm Current research indicates that only 1 in 8 survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) report their abusive experiences, often years later. For practitioners, providing effective therapy becomes challenging when both survivors and therapists are not able to recognise the linkages between a range of mental and physical health issues and a history of CSA. Such linkages may be manifest in emotional dysregulation, addictions, self-harm and suicidal ideation, anxiety disorders, sexual health and relational difficulties, personality disorders as well as persistent somatic complaints, chronic pain, autoimmune disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome. The danger of not being able to identity the relationship between CSA and presenting symptoms is that CSA remains undetected which can lead to misinterpretation and pervasive mental and physical health problems. It is critical that practitioners in a wide range of mental and physical health settings have a good understanding of the impact and long term effects of CSA and how this manifests in a range of clinical settings so that they are able to respond appropriately. This seminar, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, aims to enhance our comprehension of CSA, its impact and long term effects on survivors, while explaining how, as practitioners, we can work effectively using the principles of safe trauma therapy, psychoeducation and stabilisation to restore control and to allow for the processing of the CSA narrative. Using illustrative case examples, the seminar will present a range of skills that facilitate right brain engagement, while emphasising the importance of the therapeutic relationship to build shame resilience and facilitate post traumatic growth. The seminar will also examine the impact of working with survivors on practitioners and explain how we can minimise vicarious traumatisation and secondary traumatic stress through counsellor self-care. In identifying a range of therapeutic skills and the challenges of working with survivors of CSA, practitioners will feel more equipped when working with survivors and appreciate the transformative effects of post traumatic growth for both client and practitioner. Specifically, we will consider: The nature and dynamics of CSA such as: the grooming process, secrecy and the distortion of reality CSA as Trauma and its neurobiological impact The psychological impact and long term effects of CSA The intergenerational transmission of CSA The role of shame and self-blame The principles of safe trauma therapy, psychoeducation and stabilisation The importance of the therapeutic relationship and right brain based therapeutic skills Challenges and impact of working with CSA on practitioners Post traumatic growth further details & bookings
Attachment and the Transformation of Relational Wounds A one day workshop with Miriam Taylor London, 14 October 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm Relational trauma, or a violation of human connection (Judith Herman 1992), has significant debilitating impact on early attachment patterns, which in turn establish our internal working models. Evidence also supports the observation that significant traumas which occur during adult life often have a contagion effect on those closest to the victim, who, because of their own shock, distress and lack of understanding are unable to provide the necessary regulating milieu for recovery. Furthermore, where early developmental traumas have been significant, in later life the individual becomes more sensitized to interpreting subsequent experiences as actual or impending repetition of original trauma. Thus, as therapists, we may be faced with: disorganised attachment manifestations recovery resistant internal working models lack of alternative attachment figures and potentially fearful responses to therapeutic approaches At this practical and therapeutically oriented workshop, Miriam approaches relational trauma from an attachment and interpersonal neurobiology perspective and explains that for relational trauma, the effectiveness of therapy is contingent upon the success of the interactive repair process after ruptures, and the new understanding that can arise from it. She posits that in our therapeutic endeavours, ruptures are not problems to be solved, but rather inevitable, necessary, and handled skilfully, potentially healing. She explains that in order to regulate the relationship it is necessary to have something to regulate, and ruptures present relational opportunities to do so. The workshop considers the relational patterns that typically emerge in therapeutic relationships, examines the push and pull of our client’s relational needs, and explains effective interventions which can help our clients transform their relational wounds. Specifically, the workshop considers: The significance of the locus of control shift Control issues in therapy Attachment in the context of survival defences Understanding disorganised attachment Working with shame and shame avoidance Rupture and repair: a protocol for facilitating repair Recognising and working with therapeutic enactments Dealing with challenges to boundaries Developing therapist self-awareness and support The Window of Tolerance as a relational model Intergenerational trauma and the traumatised field Trauma ecology: aspects of post-traumatic growth Earned adult attachment further details & bookings
Engaging Traumatized Clients who Avoid Attachment, Closeness & Painful Feelings A 2-day training workshop at London with Dr Robert T. Muller London, 27 & 28 October 2017, Friday and Saturday 9:30am - 5:00pm on both days Note: workshop registrations include a complimentary copy of Dr Muller’s award-winning book: ‘Trauma & the Avoidant Client’ (winner of the 2011 ISSTD award for the year’s best written work on Trauma) This practical workshop, led by Dr Robert T. Muller – a leading expert on therapy for Trauma and globally acclaimed author of the psychotherapy bestseller: ‘Trauma & the Avoidant Client, Attachment-Based Strategies for Healing’ – is aimed at building our therapeutic understanding of clinical work with avoidant clients. While there has been considerable research into treatment of trauma, surprisingly little work has focused on specific intervention strategies to help traumatised clients who are avoidant of attachment. Many clients cope with traumatic intra-familial experiences by minimising painful feelings, by becoming emotionally distant, and by devaluing interpersonal closeness, intimacy and feelings of vulnerability. With individuals who adopt a self-protective help-rejecting stance, psychotherapy can prove extremely challenging for client and therapist alike. Drawing upon attachment theory and research, and upon a wealth of clinical experience, Dr Muller explains how, as psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, we can work with such hard-to-treat clients, how we can find points of entry and ways in which we can make contact. Using a relational, psychodynamic approach, the workshop discusses and demonstrates strategies for developing the therapeutic relationship, such that we can assist the client regain a sense of trust in others. We explore therapeutic techniques through which the client is encouraged to take interpersonal risks, to mourn losses, and to face vulnerabilities. Uniquely, Dr Muller illustrates how the frustrating challenges that arise in the therapeutic relationship can in fact be used as a productive force in the therapeutic process. Throughout the workshop, Theory is complemented by case examples and segments from Dr Muller’s own therapeutic sessions. The workshop focusses on clinical skills that are directly applicable in our work as therapists. Course aims The course aims to provide an integrative training approach that enables practitioners using different therapeutic modalities to integrate the relevant elements of Attachment Theory and Research with their existing skills, which they can then apply to their work, so as to: recognise characteristics of avoidant attachment productively use trauma-related symptoms maximise client engagement throughout the process work with affect recognise and utilise client transference plan for the termination phase of therapy A CPD certificate for 14 CPD hours is provided at the end of the course. further details & bookings
Working with Domestic Abuse A one day workshop with Christiane Sanderson Dublin, 28 October 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm Domestic Violence services across Ireland answer nearly 50,000 helpline support and information calls in a year. On average, two women a week in the UK are murdered by their partner or ex-partner. While much of the clinical literature focuses on physical violence in domestic abuse (DA), there is increasing evidence that power, control, coercion and emotional abuse is used to control partners in intimate relationships. This workshop, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, aims to enhance our comprehension of DA, its impact and long term effects on survivors; while explaining how, as practitioners, we can work effectively using the principles of safe trauma therapy, psychoeducation and stabilisation to restore control and to allow for the processing of the DA narrative. It will look at the spectrum of DA, including the dynamics of control and coercion in emotional abuse, and the role of shame and humiliation that silences those who are being domestically abused. The workshop will consider the use of physical force, sexual violence, financial abuse, spiritual abuse and revenge porn, and identify those most at risk of DA. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the processes involved in DA such as grooming victims, the cycle of abuse, the role of dissociation and thought blindness that supports the trauma bond which binds the couple. The aim is to understand the role of attachment and fear of abandonment that underpins much of DA and how this manifests relationally both for the couple and practitioners working with DA. We also look at the importance of the therapeutic relationship in restoring relational worth, mitigating the de-humanising effects of DA and restoring autonomy and self-agency. Conceptualising DA within the complex trauma framework, we consider the processing of the DA narrative and the facilitation of post traumatic growth. By identifying the challenges of working with DA and introducing a range of therapeutic skills, practitioners will feel more equipped when working with survivors of DA and enhance their comprehension of the transformative effects of post traumatic growth for both clients and practitioners. Specifically, we will consider: The nature and dynamics of DA, such as the role of charm and enticement, the use of control and coercion, the cycle of abuse, the nature of thought blindness that facilitates the trauma bond and the role of silence, secrecy and shame The intergenerational transmission of DA through attachment and relational deficits The characteristics of male and female perpetrators DA as complex trauma and its neurobiological impact The psychological impact and long term effects of DA on partners, and children Obstacles to leaving an abusive relationship The importance of developing safety plans when leaving The principles of trauma informed practice model when working with survivors of DA The role of the therapeutic relationship in restoring autonomy and self-agency The impact of working with DA on practitioners and the role of self-care further details & bookings
In Conversation with Babette Rothschild, author of The Body Remembers, Volumes 1 & 2 An evening discussion and formal book launch event with limited seating London, 2 November 2017, Thursday 6:30pm - 8:30pm As therapists, we recognize that understanding an updated and integrated view of the Autonomic Nervous System can allow for more precise observation and modulation of arousal states. On 2nd of November, join us for an intellectually stimulating discussion with Babette Rothschild, as she formally launches her new book at London and talks us through both traditional and more recent theories of ANS organization, including those of Stephen Porges. We will have the opportunity, to talk to Babette about: • Clear Thinking, the ANS, and the Brain • Precise Observation of the ANS • Safer Trauma Treatment for Both Client and Therapist: Regulation of the ANS • a new tool for more accurate observation of ANS levels of arousal • Two types of freeze responses as well as two types of hypoarousal states Participants will each receive a laminated version of the new 6-colour ANS table to keep and continue to use in their work and for their own self-care. further details & bookings
Engaging Traumatized Clients who Avoid Attachment, Closeness & Painful Feelings A one-day training workshop at Vancouver with Dr Robert T. Muller Vancouver, Canada, 6 November 2017, Monday 9:30am - 5:00pm Note: workshop registrations include a complimentary copy of Dr Muller’s award-winning book: ‘Trauma & the Avoidant Client’ (winner of the 2011 ISSTD award for the year’s best written work on Trauma) This practical workshop, led by Dr Robert T. Muller – a leading expert on therapy for Trauma and globally acclaimed author of the psychotherapy bestseller: ‘Trauma & the Avoidant Client, Attachment-Based Strategies for Healing’ – is aimed at building our therapeutic understanding of clinical work with avoidant clients. While there has been considerable research into treatment of trauma, surprisingly little work has focused on specific intervention strategies to help traumatised clients who are avoidant of attachment. Many clients cope with traumatic intra-familial experiences by minimising painful feelings, by becoming emotionally distant, and by devaluing interpersonal closeness, intimacy and feelings of vulnerability. With individuals who adopt a self-protective help-rejecting stance, psychotherapy can prove extremely challenging for client and therapist alike. Drawing upon attachment theory and research, and upon a wealth of clinical experience, Dr Muller explains how, as psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, we can work with such hard-to-treat clients, how we can find points of entry and ways in which we can make contact. Using a relational, psychodynamic approach, the workshop discusses and demonstrates strategies for developing the therapeutic relationship, such that we can assist the client regain a sense of trust in others. We explore therapeutic techniques through which the client is encouraged to take interpersonal risks, to mourn losses, and to face vulnerabilities. Uniquely, Dr Muller illustrates how the frustrating challenges that arise in the therapeutic relationship can in fact be used as a productive force in the therapeutic process. Throughout the workshop, Theory is complemented by case examples and segments from Dr Muller’s own therapeutic sessions. The workshop focusses on clinical skills that are directly applicable in our work as therapists. Course aims The course aims to provide an integrative training approach that enables practitioners using different therapeutic modalities to integrate the relevant elements of Attachment Theory and Research with their existing skills, which they can then apply to their work, so as to: recognise characteristics of avoidant attachment productively use trauma-related symptoms maximise client engagement throughout the process work with affect recognise and utilise client transference plan for the termination phase of therapy further details & bookings
Sustaining Joy In Our Practice: Understanding Risks of Vicarious Trauma and Fostering Resilience A one day workshop with Dr Gertie Quitangon and Dr Mark R. Evces London, 9 November 2017, Thursday 10:00am - 4:00pm Around the world, therapists experience secondary trauma exposure in the process of empathic engagement with clients. Vicarious trauma, or lasting negative changes in beliefs about the self, the world, and others, is an inadvertent response to such secondary trauma exposure. This emotional residue of exposure that we have, when we hear narratives of pain, fear and terror – has the potential to have debilitating effects on our health and productivity. Without a conscious cognizance of such risks, our responses to vicarious trauma can include: disruption of positive beliefs in trust, intimacy, safety, self-esteem and control decreased work productivity cynicism and loss of meaning at work poor work-life boundaries health issues including depression, eating disorders, loss of sleep and anxiety disorders diminished feelings of satisfaction and personal accomplishment avoidance of work with severely traumatized clients withdrawal and isolation from colleagues over-involvement in details and obsessive-compulsive manifestations At this practical and engaging workshop by Dr Gertie Quitangon and Dr Mark R. Evces, we consider specific ways in which individual therapists and organizations can address vicarious trauma. We look at case studies, vicarious trauma theory and practical, individualized tools that are aimed at early recognition of vicarious trauma and the development of effective safeguards. Specifically, we look at: the nature of resilience required to combat vicarious trauma post-traumatic growth and the positive effects of working with trauma victims best practices for promoting resilience that can be used in both individualized and organizational settings further details & bookings
Affect Confusion, Cumulative Trauma and Attachment Disruptions: Psychotherapy for Borderline Disorders A 2-day training workshop at London on Relational and Integrative Psychotherapy with Dr Richard G. Erskine London, 10 & 11 November 2017, Friday and Saturday 9:30am - 5:00pm on both days For many psychotherapists, borderline clients present a professional challenge because of their frequent relational conflicts, varying developmental levels of transference, and their polarization of emotions, such as: idealization and hate, elation and despair, anger and dependency. This two-day course will provide diagnostic perspectives on Attachment Disruptions, an understanding of the aetiology of Early Affect-Confusion and the formation of the Borderline Personality, the therapeutic use of treatment contracts, the significance of an attuned therapeutic relationship, and working knowledge of when and how to use behavioural interventions and/or supportive age regression. At this unique and practical training workshop, Dr Richard Erskine draws on an integrative therapeutic and relational approach and specifically draws our attention to clients whose narrative is characterized by affect confusion and attachment disruptions – where the narrative alternates between blaming others and self-criticism, where the client seeks justification for felt rage and harbours explicit confusions about how others treat him/her. In a relationship-oriented psychotherapy, the therapist’s self is focused on assisting the client’s process of developing and integrating full contact and the fulfillment of relational needs. Of particular importance is the process of attunement, not just to thoughts, feelings, behaviors and physical sensations, but also to vitality affects, such that an experience of unbroken feeling-connectedness is created. Through lecture, case-vignettes, videos, therapy demonstrations and clinical discussions, the workshop helps us examine and identify reparative action for potentially unmet relational needs, which can include: Validation and affirmation within a relationship Acceptance by a stable, dependable and protective other person Confirmation of personal experience Self-definition Impacting the other person Specifically, we consider the interpersonal needs which may often have been absent in our client’s significant relationships: for the other to be patient, calm, consistent, dependable and validating; and how the therapist can provide opportunities for the client’s self-definition and agency. We consider the unique, professional challenges that we face in such situations, when the client presents with apparent relational conflicts, varying developmental levels of transference and polarization of emotions. Keeping in mind the therapeutic challenges we face as psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Richard focuses on the centrality of an involved therapeutic relationship while emphasizing the in-depth methods of a psychotherapy that integrates the client's affect, cognition, physiology and behaviour. Emphasis will be placed on: diagnostic perspectives on Attachment Disruptions an understanding of the aetiology of early Affect-Confusion and the formation of the Borderline Personality the therapeutic use of treatment contracts the significance of an attuned therapeutic relationship, and a working knowledge of when and how to use behavioural interventions and/or supportive regressions Overall, the workshop equips us with practical methods that are effective in psychotherapy, including: methods of transference resolution and countertransference identification, the bifurcation of therapeutically relevant challenges, calibrating for juxtaposition reactions, responding to oscillating relational-needs, and the importance of a sustained phenomenological inquiry and affect attunement further details & bookings
Unconscious Relational Patterns, Cumulative Neglect, and Therapeutic Involvement A one-day training workshop with Dr Richard G. Erskine London, 13 November 2017, Monday 9:30am - 5:00pm Unconscious systems of psychological organisation and self-regulation are developed by our clients as a consequence of cumulative failures in significant, dependent relationships. Unconscious relational patterns may be ‘perceived’ by the client as physiological tensions, incomprehensible affects, longings and repulsions. In this context, the therapist’s sensitivity to and understanding of unconscious experiential conclusions, and the unique relational nature of therapeutic involvement is essential for an in-depth therapy of archaic relational patterns, current relational disturbances and fixated systems of psychological organisation. At this unique and practical training workshop, Dr Richard Erskine draws on an integrative therapeutic and relational psychotherapy approach that encompasses the primary dimensions of human functioning: cognitive, behavioural, affective and physiological, each within a relational system; that allows us as therapists in helping the client to assimilate and harmonise the contents of his or her ego states, relax the defence mechanisms, relinquish the life script, and reengage the world with full contact. It is the process of making whole: taking disowned, unaware, unresolved aspects of the ego and making them part of the cohesive self. Through lecture, case vignettes and clinical discussions, the workshop emphasises how early attachments are formed through physiological survival reactions, implicit conclusions, explicit decisions, and introjections at various stages in the process of development. Dr. Erskine will elucidate: How early physiological, affective and interpersonal experiences may inhibit the client’s intrapsychic processes, health and relationships The distinctions in our therapeutic approach based on Attachment styles and patterns The developmental impact of cumulative neglect and relational traumas The relationship of Attachment to unconscious processes and the formation of Life Scripts The workshop posits that for effective in-depth therapy, it is essential that therapists understand the significance of internal working models; procedural, sub-symbolic and implicit memory; and the unconscious impact of cumulative neglect. Such an understanding requires taking into account many views of human functioning: psychodynamic, client-centred, behaviourist, family therapy, Gestalt therapy, neo-Reichian, object relations theories, psychoanalytic self-psychology and transactional analysis. Drawing on an integrative theme, Dr Erskine helps us comprehend psychotherapeutic interventions that are: based on research-validated knowledge of normal developmental processes and the theories describing the self-protective defensive processes used when there are interruptions in normal development further details & bookings
Managing Power, Control, Boundary and Attachment Dynamics when working with Survivors of Abuse A one day training workshop with Christiane Sanderson London, 18 November 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm When working with survivors of physical, sexual, domestic or spiritual abuse, practitioners need to ensure that abuse dynamics do not inadvertently get replicated in the therapeutic process, while always being mindful of the need to minimise re-traumatisation. As therapists, we are aware that the systematic and repeated misuse of power and control that underpins abuse and complex trauma such as the use of threat, terror, silence, secrecy, shame and distortion of reality dehumanises survivors and renders them voiceless and vulnerable. These dynamics can often get re-enacted during the therapeutic process through client-therapist interactions that assert power and control, appeasement behaviours such as compliance and submission, boundary violations and oscillations between connection and disconnection. This training workshop, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, aims to identify the ways in which these dynamics manifest within the therapeutic space and how these can be managed. The objective is to facilitate a more collaborative, non-hierarchical and relational approach in which survivors can truly heal, rather than being catapulted back into trauma dynamics. To this effect the importance of ‘being with’ rather than ‘doing to’ will be emphasised alongside practical ways by which re-shaming or re-traumatising of survivors is minimised, so as to offer a genuine human relationship in which our clients have the safe opportunity to recover and heal. Specifically, we will consider: The dehumanising impact of power and control on survivors of abuse The role of silence, secrecy, boundary violations and distortion of reality The impact of complex trauma on attachment and relational difficulties, including the trauma bond and how this can manifest in the therapeutic relationship How to manage power and control dynamics in the therapeutic relationship Attachment and the dual liability – where clients are unable to seek comfort from an attachment figure, who might also be the abuser How to work with the fact that survivors of abuse experience relationships as dangerous and terrifying, rather than as sources of comfort How we can create a safe, predictable and consistent therapeutic space to reverse the unpredictability and inconsistency associated with trauma How we can facilitate a more collaborative, non-hierarchical and relationship approach through ‘being with’ rather than ‘doing to’ further details & bookings
Dissociation and Dissociative Disorders: Therapy for ‘Difficult’ Clients A 2-day training workshop at London Dr Suzette Boon London, 23 & 24 November 2017, Thursday and Friday 9:30am - 5:00pm on both days Our challenges, as therapists, are manifold when faced with acute manifestations of dissociation, including complex dissociative disorders: Our clients may present with difficult conditions – engendering feelings of guilt, rage, shame, humiliation, helplessness and incompetency while seeming to resist all therapeutic efforts We may not have an in-depth comprehension of dissociation – some schools of thought consider dissociation a phenomenon that exists on a continuum (from normal to pathological) while others consider dissociation as strongly pathological and representative of a divided self Our clients rarely present with explicit dissociative symptoms – they often attempt to hide or dissimulate such manifestations Dissociative disorders are hard to differentiate from cluster B personality disorders and bipolar disorders Even the existence of certain dissociative disorders is a subject of ongoing polarized debates As a consequence of these challenges and in the face of apparent resistance, we run the risk of retreating into destructive enmeshment or distancing from our clients. At this practical, engaging and therapeutically oriented workshop which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, across modalities, Dr Boon draws on her innovative work on dissociative disorders and complex trauma to help us work especially with such difficult clients. Through case vignettes and examples, she equips us with therapeutic tools that prove useful for four interconnected challenges that difficult clients present: 1. Dissociation: the workshop enables us to recognise pathological dissociative symptoms, assess DSM-5 dissociative disorders, distinguish between genuine and false positive cases and explains therapeutic work techniques for dissociative parts 2. Chronic defences: we look at defences against perceived relational threats including criticism, rejection, abandonment, engulfment and control; working with angry and sadistic dissociative parts and self-destructive behaviour 3. Chronic defences against inner experience: the workshop looks at our clients’ defences with reference to affects, cognitions, physical sensations, wishes and needs. We look at the challenges this presents for therapy, especially where regulation of intense emotions becomes a pre-requisite for therapeutic progress 4. Self-regulation difficulties: we look at these through the lens of the three phases of therapy: a. Stabilisation and symptom reduction b. Treatment of traumatic memories, realization of the past c. Integration and rehabilitation The workshop highlights that the actual prognosis of a difficult client depends to some extent on the goodness of fit between client and therapist – as well as on prognostic indicators. In the overall approach advocated by this workshop, interventions are first directed at the therapist who must walk the fine line of acting with reflection rather than reaction. Dr Boon explains that such a reflective stance can prove to be a therapeutic strategy in itself for the client, paving the way for further interventions. Using video vignettes, Dr Boon explains practical therapeutic strategies that incorporate comprehension of: The differences and similarities between dissociation and hypoarousal – when do clients alternate between hypoarousal and hyperarousal? Compartmentalized and disparate senses of self in our clients, thus allowing us to comprehend manifestations as activities of dissociative parts Situations where dissociation and psychosis may co-exist and situations where these may lead to confusing symptomatology The role of dissociative parts in other comorbid clinical manifestations (such as the exacerbation of other symptoms and disorders like depression, self-harm, suicidality, eating problems, addition and panic) Avoiding false positive assessments Overcoming the challenging task of obtaining a therapeutic alliance with clients who have a complex trauma history (in particular with those who exhibit dissociative disorders) Developing a working alliance with hostile and destructive dissociative parts; Techniques for regulating emotions and for dealing with triggers Transference and countertransference considerations in the phase oriented approach; Self-care for the therapist Creating a working alliance with aggressive and / or persecutory personalities further details & bookings
New Approaches to Working with Bodies Today A one day seminar with Susie Orbach London, 25 November 2017, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm As practising therapists and counsellors, we witness the impact of calls for bodily transformations, enhancements and ‘perfectibility’ in the consulting room. Our clients may not be consulting us on body troubles, but whatever their emotional predicaments and conflicts, concern for the body is nearly always folded into them. At this intellectually stimulating and practical seminar, Susie Orbach explores our challenges as therapists in a culture where the individual is deemed accountable for his or her body and judged by it. She contends that the body itself has grown as complicated a place as sexuality was for Freud. It too is shaped and misshaped by our earliest encounters with parents and carers, who also contain in themselves the representations of culture, with its multitude of injunctions about how the body should appear and be attended to. Relying on a psychoanalytic and developmental approach and drawing on findings from the labs of neuro-psychoanalysts and neuro-psychologists, Susie looks closely at the implications for our therapeutic interactions and explains starting points for a theory of body development which are just as compelling as our existing theories of the mind. Susie Orbach first wrote about the body in Fat is a Feminist Issue in 1978 bringing the issues of compulsive eating and body troubles to a wide audience. Despite writing books on many other topics, she’s returned to the theme of the body many times. In 1986, she published Hunger Strike, in 2002 she published On Eating and in 2009 the award winning Bodies in The Great Ideas series. She has written many professional papers and popular articles on the topic and been the Keynote Speaker at Government conferences in Australia, Austria, Germany and the UK. She is author of a recent Government paper Two for the Price of One and an expanded version of her new publication In Therapy is being released in 2018. She sits on The Government’s expert panel on Body Confidence and gave testimony to the APPG Inquiry in 2013. Together with her colleagues in New York, Susie has developed the BODI – Body Observational Diagnostic Interview – an instrument that enables therapists understand the issues of embodiment more deeply. Susie sees clients for individual and couple therapy and has been an advisor to the NHS, The World Bank and Unilever. further details & bookings
Love, Narcissism and Sexual Fantasy An evening workshop with Dr Christopher Clulow London, 1 December 2017, Friday 6:30pm - 9:00pm The nature of love has perplexed and preoccupied us all at different stages of our lives. Our work as therapists calls upon us to consider multiple aspects of love, distinguishing between the fantasy-rich but passive state of being ‘in love’ (a condition that Freud described as a temporary psychosis and subsequent psychoanalysts have compared with borderline states of mind) – and the more active process of loving another person, with the assumption of relational alterity that this implies. At this interactive workshop that would be relevant for psychotherapists, clinical psychologists and counsellors, Dr Clulow considers love and sexual fantasy in the context of developmental processes. Combining Attachment-based approaches with object relations/relational perspectives, the workshop looks at: Aspects of love the intoxicating experience of being in love; dimensions of loving; narcissistic aspects of partner choice Love and sexual fantasy tensions between love and sexuality; functions of sexual fantasy in love relationships; implications for clinical practice further details & bookings
Addressing Personal and Clinical Challenges in Therapy A one day seminar with Susie Orbach London, 20 January 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm Last year, as part of Radio 4 series In Therapy, Susie Orbach discussed a wide range of clinical dilemmas that we witness, as practising therapists and counsellors – the dynamics of the first session, dealing with erotic transference, perplexing and conflicting client behaviour and the challenges that come with client dyads. In 2018, Susie is releasing an expanded and updated version of her new publication In Therapy and this workshop presents some new challenges and dilemmas that we face at both personal and clinical levels. Through interactive engagements with participants and seminar sub-sections, we specifically consider: Deconstructing anger: What does the therapist need to consider in the face of intense anger from the client? How do we engage the client, so as to gain comprehension of the underlying palate of emotions which have found expression through anger? What practical steps can we take, as therapists, to work with a more complex and textured sense of self that the therapeutic engagement is presenting in such cases? Also, what sense do we make of our own transferential responses? Dealing with the aftermath of illness: Our cultural story about illness sees it as a crisis, with heroic overtones associated with fighting back. The inner experience for our clients however can range from despair to survivor guilt to exhilaration. What happens after recovery? What is thrown up post illness? Are there ways to minimize the kind of discomfort that illness can cause the therapist and the client? Therapy for the elderly: Therapeutic engagement with the elderly can present unique challenges. For example, how do we reflect on and manage an unexpected single life when death or dementia takes one’s partner away. We look at the effective use of therapeutic techniques that work best in such cases. Cross-generational Challenges: Cross-generational challenges come in different configurations: trauma transfer across generations for instance. As an example, we might be faced with dynamics in a mother-daughter relationship in which the daughter’s struggle to differentiate, and the mother’s struggle to let go, can implode. What are the pitfalls in cross-generational work and how can we best avoid these? These dilemmas are made even more challenging by the fact that our intended interventions may have multiple, and indeed co-existent objectives – our words may be directed at facilitating the client’s narrative or at slowing down the narrative and assisting our client in her thought process. At this intellectually stimulating and practical seminar, Susie Orbach relies on a psychoanalytic and developmental approach and draws on therapeutic case examples to help us closely examine the challenging facets of our client interactions. The aim of the seminar is to get as close to the experience of a therapy session as possible. To facilitate the process at the seminar, we will hear excerpts from the two recent Radio 4 series In Therapy which span a variety of clinical situations. We will then dissect parts of the sessions to understand what was said by the therapist and why. Susie will also facilitate similar dissection of clinical material brought by participants with a view to elucidating the crucial aspects of our interventions that make these effective. She explains the best practices that therapists employ to overcome these commonly occurring dilemmas while providing interventions that: focus on affect and examine the complexity of feelings our clients may be experiencing challenge our client’s conceptions of events when these appear out of kilter with the inner world effectively get behind defence structures Susie Orbach first wrote about the body in Fat is a Feminist Issue in 1978 bringing the issues of compulsive eating and body troubles to a wide audience. Despite writing books on many other topics, she’s returned to the theme of the body many times. In 1986, she published Hunger Strike, in 2002 she published On Eating and in 2009 the award winning Bodies in The Great Ideas series. She has written many professional papers and popular articles on the topic and been the Keynote Speaker at Government conferences in Australia, Austria, Germany and the UK. She is author of a recent Government paper Two for the Price of One and an expanded version of her new publication In Therapy is being released in 2018. She sits on The Government’s expert panel on Body Confidence and gave testimony to the APPG Inquiry in 2013. Together with her colleagues in New York, Susie has developed the BODI – Body Observational Diagnostic Interview – an instrument that enables therapists understand the issues of embodiment more deeply. Susie sees clients for individual and couple therapy and has been an advisor to the NHS, The World Bank and Unilever. further details & bookings
Grandparents’ Relationships with their Grandchildren: implications for therapy A one day workshop with Professor Ann Buchanan London, 26 January 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm All around the world, family networks are changing from broad / horizontal to narrow / vertical structures or beanpole families, in which grandparents have an increasingly significant role to play (Hagestad). In addition, recent research on intergenerational relations has shown strong associations between the extent of grandparental involvement and the developmental well-being of individuals. These dynamics can create challenges for therapists when, for example, the parent coming to the clinic may not indeed be the parent doing the parenting. Alternatively, we may be seeing clients who may no longer be able to live safely with a parent, having suffered trauma, abuse or neglect, and are being cared for by grandparents. At this practical and interactive workshop that would be relevant for psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Professor Ann Buchanan will use a perspective based on attachment theory and developmental tenets to consider implications for our clinical practices. Using case vignettes and practical examples, we consider: Changing societal norms and the emergence of the grandparent army The need to think beyond the immediate parents and incorporate the role of grandparents in our therapeutic interactions How this understanding influences the way we think about families and respond to their therapeutic needs The particular challenges that kinship carers face Good guys, bad guys. Helpful and unhelpful relationships Attachment dynamics of grandparental involvement Outcomes for individuals who have suffered severe abuse and neglect Ann will not only present material based on published evidence; but also, use group discussion and clinical case vignettes as part of the workshop. further details & bookings
The Missing Link: Working with the Traumatised Body A one day workshop with Miriam Taylor London, 27 January 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm Because trauma is fundamentally and implicitly stored in the body, major contemporary therapeutic approaches advocate somatic interventions. It is often the case that the body tells the story for which the client may not have found words yet, and we need to find ways to listen to the story behind the symptoms. For many therapists trained to work verbally or from the ‘top-down’, working with the body is unfamiliar and this workshop aims to encourage therapists to work from the ‘bottom-up’ as well. The workshop will introduce some of the ideas and techniques which can lead to understanding and resolving the somatic markers of trauma. At this practical and clinically oriented workshop which would be relevant for all practitioners working with Trauma (including PTSD, Complex Trauma and Dissociative Disorders), Miriam Taylor highlights the case for therapists to adopt a body-sensitive approach to trauma. Starting from a theoretical base developed both from neuroscience and existential phenomenology, the body will be considered as the primary organiser and integrator of traumatic experience. A particular focus will be on experiential aspects of working with arousal, sensation and movement, and consideration will be given to trauma-based fears associated with connecting with the bodily self. Through experiential elements and case vignettes, the workshop helps us comprehend: Trauma: a public and personal health issue The neurobiology of trauma – the triune brain, the vagus nerve, HPA axis and the window of tolerance; Hebb’s axiom Somatic memory – implicit and procedural learning The orienting response – assessment and possible interventions Embodied resonance and the therapist – reading the story Dysregulated arousal as a whole-body experience Understanding phobias of bodily experience The ambiguous relationship many trauma victims have with pain Shame and the body Dissociation as disconnection from bodily experience Reconnecting with the lived body – the phenomenological method Breath – how and when to offer a range of techniques Self-harm and the body Reclaiming sexuality after sexual trauma Trauma, self care and long term health further details & bookings
EMDR Therapy & Mindfulness for Trauma-Focused Care An evening webinar with Dr Jamie Marich Online, 31 January 2018, Wednesday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) has been recommended as an effective psychotherapy for PTSD and other trauma and stressor-related disorders by organisations worldwide including US, Britain, France, the Netherlands and Israel; and practitioners have increasingly started incorporating EMDR techniques as viable additions to psychoanalytical and cognitive approaches. Mindfulness practice meanwhile has formed the basis of a wide range of psychotherapeutic techniques that have found application in alleviating the manifestations of depression, stress, anxiety and addictions. At this practical and clinical application oriented training webinar, Dr Jamie Marich explains how we can build a mindfulness-informed therapeutic practice, guided by the EMDR approach, specifically when working with Trauma and its myriad variations. Dr Marich especially demonstrates how trauma-focussed skills can be adapted for clients who traditionally ‘resist’ affect regulation and stabilization strategies. Uniquely, she doesn’t present these skills as alternatives to our existing modalities but instead highlights how we can incorporate simple, effective, mindfulness and EMDR-informed approaches into our existing clinical models. Through a video demonstration and discussions, we explore: • The foundations of mindfulness practice and how these can be translated into clinical settings • An initial orientation to how the EMDR approach to psychotherapy views trauma, with a close look at how Francine Shapiro drew upon mind body strategies in her development of EMDR therapy • Ways to use bilateral stimulation / dual attention stimulus as exercises in moving mindfulness • How a mindful practice can improve clinical outcomes For participants not trained in EMDR therapy, this webinar provides an orientation, while for participants already trained in EMDR, this webinar introduces methodologies that allow for bolstering elements of mindfulness practice; all with a view to enhancing our efficacy in delivering EMDR therapy, particularly when it comes to improving attunement to clients and honing clinical decision making. further details & bookings
Attachment-informed Psychotherapy: an integrative neuroscience-based model A one day workshop with Professor Jeremy Holmes London, 3 March 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm 21st Century psychotherapy is a practice in search of a theory. Despite competing and seemingly irreconcilable narratives and theoretical differences, empirical evidence suggests that the most potent agents of change are ‘common factors’, rather than specific theoretical techniques. Attachment Theory provides the evidence-base which helps to explain this. But what does attachment-informed therapy look like in the consulting room, and can its ideas and techniques be incorporated into existing models such as CBT, psychoanalytic, systemic and integrative therapies? At this practical and interactive workshop that would be relevant for psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Professor Holmes distils key features of Attachment Theory, viewing these through the lens of an integrative, neuroscientific model, to explore: affect regulation, sensitivity, and mentalising and their respective roles in psychotherapeutic practice neuroscientific implications of attachment and their therapeutic relevance using attachment ideas to foster resilience and tailor interventions to the degree of client disturbance how attachment-informed radical acceptance helps promote change in working with adults, children, couples and families the role of mentalising / ‘mind-mindedness’ in child development and in the therapist-client relationship; and the emergence of complex and nuanced narratives over the course of therapy The workshop includes a ‘live supervision’ session illustrating the practical implications of these theoretical discussions. further details & bookings
Working with PTSD & Complex PTSD from an Attachment Perspective A 2-day training workshop at London with Dr Felicity de Zulueta London, 11 & 12 May 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm on both days This practical workshop, led by Dr Felicity de Zulueta – one of UK’s leading experts on PTSD and complex PTSD – begins by discussing the latest diagnostic criteria for simple PTSD, and its dissociative manifestations, as they are presented in the new DSM V. The workshop highlights how these diagnostic criteria ignore the existence of a wide range of presentations that arise in survivors of childhood abuse and emotional neglect as well as those who have suffered from chronic and severe exposure to traumatic events, a condition unofficially referred to as ‘developmental PTSD’ and ‘complex PTSD’. Such a state of affairs can leave therapists treating these clients / patients with little or no guidance in relation to the aetiology, diagnosis, assessment and treatment of their symptoms and makes research in the field very difficult. Dr Zulueta demonstrates how an understanding of PTSD and complex PTSD from an attachment perspective, enables one to make sense of both the psychological and somatic symptoms clients / patients present with and the recent epigenetic findings relating to transmission of PTSD down the generations. By integrating her clinical experience with Attachment research, Dr Zulueta outlines the process by which psychotherapeutically trained practitioners can assess and prepare traumatised clients for the ‘journey of therapy’ whilst bearing in mind their need for emotional regulation and a sense of security. The workshop discusses different therapeutic approaches to stabilisation & treatment of PTSD and the way severe traumatic attachments can lead to resistance to change. Viewing the assessment and treatment of PTSD through the lens of Attachment Theory, the workshop helps practitioners understand how a rupture in the neurobiological capacity to attune and the capacity to mentalise is fundamental to our understanding of traumatised individuals, while also providing practical new approaches to therapy for both complex and developmental PTSD. Utilising a series of video vignettes and clinical case examples, Dr Zulueta helps us comprehend the linkages between PTSD, Borderline Personality Disorder, dissociative disorders and violent behaviour. Course aims The course aims to provide an integrative training approach that enables practitioners using different therapeutic modalities to integrate the relevant elements of Attachment Theory and Research with their existing skills, which they can then apply to their work with people suffering from Complex PTSD in particular. A CPD certificate for 10 CPD hours is provided at the end of the course. further details & bookings

nscience UK is an independent organisation that seeks to explore the interdisciplinary richness of mental health disciplines. Through a series of seminars, workshops and conferences that are conducted throughout the year, we aim to present the latest advances in theory and research to practitioners; with a view to furthering their continuing professional development.

Disclaimer: Individuals pictured are either conference speakers or models. All images are used for illustrative purposes only.

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Continuing professional development through seminars, workshops and conferences for psychotherapists, counsellors and psychologists.