SEMINARS & WORKSHOPS in 2018
Grandparents’ Relationships with their Grandchildren: implications for therapy A one day workshop with Professor Ann Buchanan London, 26 January 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm All around the world, family networks are changing from broad / horizontal to narrow / vertical structures or beanpole families, in which grandparents have an increasingly significant role to play (Hagestad). In addition, recent research on intergenerational relations has shown strong associations between the extent of grandparental involvement and the developmental well-being of individuals. These dynamics can create challenges for therapists when, for example, the parent coming to the clinic may not indeed be the parent doing the parenting. Alternatively, we may be seeing clients who may no longer be able to live safely with a parent, having suffered trauma, abuse or neglect, and are being cared for by grandparents. At this practical and interactive workshop that would be relevant for psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Professor Ann Buchanan will use a perspective based on attachment theory and developmental tenets to consider implications for our clinical practices. Using case vignettes and practical examples, we consider: Changing societal norms and the emergence of the grandparent army The need to think beyond the immediate parents and incorporate the role of grandparents in our therapeutic interactions How this understanding influences the way we think about families and respond to their therapeutic needs The particular challenges that kinship carers face Good guys, bad guys. Helpful and unhelpful relationships Attachment dynamics of grandparental involvement Outcomes for individuals who have suffered severe abuse and neglect Ann will not only present material based on published evidence; but also, use group discussion and clinical case vignettes as part of the workshop. further details & bookings
The Missing Link: Working with the Traumatised Body A one day workshop with Miriam Taylor London, 27 January 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm Because trauma is fundamentally and implicitly stored in the body, major contemporary therapeutic approaches advocate somatic interventions. It is often the case that the body tells the story for which the client may not have found words yet, and we need to find ways to listen to the story behind the symptoms. For many therapists trained to work verbally or from the ‘top-down’, working with the body is unfamiliar and this workshop aims to encourage therapists to work from the ‘bottom-up’ as well. The workshop will introduce some of the ideas and techniques which can lead to understanding and resolving the somatic markers of trauma. At this practical and clinically oriented workshop which would be relevant for all practitioners working with Trauma (including PTSD, Complex Trauma and Dissociative Disorders), Miriam Taylor highlights the case for therapists to adopt a body-sensitive approach to trauma. Starting from a theoretical base developed both from neuroscience and existential phenomenology, the body will be considered as the primary organiser and integrator of traumatic experience. A particular focus will be on experiential aspects of working with arousal, sensation and movement, and consideration will be given to trauma-based fears associated with connecting with the bodily self. Through experiential elements and case vignettes, the workshop helps us comprehend: Trauma: a public and personal health issue The neurobiology of trauma – the triune brain, the vagus nerve, HPA axis and the window of tolerance; Hebb’s axiom Somatic memory – implicit and procedural learning The orienting response – assessment and possible interventions Embodied resonance and the therapist – reading the story Dysregulated arousal as a whole-body experience Understanding phobias of bodily experience The ambiguous relationship many trauma victims have with pain Shame and the body Dissociation as disconnection from bodily experience Reconnecting with the lived body – the phenomenological method Breath – how and when to offer a range of techniques Self-harm and the body Reclaiming sexuality after sexual trauma Trauma, self care and long term health further details & bookings
Managing Power, Control, Boundary and Attachment Dynamics when working with Survivors of Abuse A one day training workshop with Christiane Sanderson Dublin, 27 January 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm When working with survivors of physical, sexual, domestic or spiritual abuse, practitioners need to ensure that abuse dynamics do not inadvertently get replicated in the therapeutic process, while always being mindful of the need to minimise re-traumatisation. As therapists, we are aware that the systematic and repeated misuse of power and control that underpins abuse and complex trauma such as the use of threat, terror, silence, secrecy, shame and distortion of reality dehumanises survivors and renders them voiceless and vulnerable. These dynamics can often get re-enacted during the therapeutic process through client-therapist interactions that assert power and control, appeasement behaviours such as compliance and submission, boundary violations and oscillations between connection and disconnection. This training workshop, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, aims to identify the ways in which these dynamics manifest within the therapeutic space and how these can be managed. The objective is to facilitate a more collaborative, non-hierarchical and relational approach in which survivors can truly heal, rather than being catapulted back into trauma dynamics. To this effect the importance of ‘being with’ rather than ‘doing to’ will be emphasised alongside practical ways by which re-shaming or re-traumatising of survivors is minimised, so as to offer a genuine human relationship in which our clients have the safe opportunity to recover and heal. Specifically, we will consider: The dehumanising impact of power and control on survivors of abuse The role of silence, secrecy, boundary violations and distortion of reality The impact of complex trauma on attachment and relational difficulties, including the trauma bond and how this can manifest in the therapeutic relationship How to manage power and control dynamics in the therapeutic relationship Attachment and the dual liability – where clients are unable to seek comfort from an attachment figure, who might also be the abuser How to work with the fact that survivors of abuse experience relationships as dangerous and terrifying, rather than as sources of comfort How we can create a safe, predictable and consistent therapeutic space to reverse the unpredictability and inconsistency associated with trauma How we can facilitate a more collaborative, non-hierarchical and relationship approach through ‘being with’ rather than ‘doing to’ further details & bookings
EMDR Therapy & Mindfulness for Trauma-Focused Care An evening webinar with Dr Jamie Marich Online, 31 January 2018, Wednesday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) has been recommended as an effective psychotherapy for PTSD and other trauma and stressor-related disorders by organisations worldwide including US, Britain, France, the Netherlands and Israel; and practitioners have increasingly started incorporating EMDR techniques as viable additions to psychoanalytical and cognitive approaches. Mindfulness practice meanwhile has formed the basis of a wide range of psychotherapeutic techniques that have found application in alleviating the manifestations of depression, stress, anxiety and addictions. At this practical and clinical application oriented training webinar, Dr Jamie Marich explains how we can build a mindfulness-informed therapeutic practice, guided by the EMDR approach, specifically when working with Trauma and its myriad variations. Dr Marich especially demonstrates how trauma-focussed skills can be adapted for clients who traditionally ‘resist’ affect regulation and stabilization strategies. Uniquely, she doesn’t present these skills as alternatives to our existing modalities but instead highlights how we can incorporate simple, effective, mindfulness and EMDR-informed approaches into our existing clinical models. Through a video demonstration and discussions, we explore: • The foundations of mindfulness practice and how these can be translated into clinical settings • An initial orientation to how the EMDR approach to psychotherapy views trauma, with a close look at how Francine Shapiro drew upon mind body strategies in her development of EMDR therapy • Ways to use bilateral stimulation / dual attention stimulus as exercises in moving mindfulness • How a mindful practice can improve clinical outcomes For participants not trained in EMDR therapy, this webinar provides an orientation, while for participants already trained in EMDR, this webinar introduces methodologies that allow for bolstering elements of mindfulness practice; all with a view to enhancing our efficacy in delivering EMDR therapy, particularly when it comes to improving attunement to clients and honing clinical decision making. further details & bookings
The Internal Object and the Problem of Deficits: when therapy gets stalled A one day seminar with Dr Anne Alvarez London, 2 February 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm Quite often, our therapeutic progress with a client can grind to a halt when we seemingly meet passivity, lack of curiosity and lack of hope. Is the client despairingly giving up on us, on therapy and / or herself? While we are cognizant that our therapeutic response needs to be different in such situations – how do we differentiate between defensive retreat and despair? While classical psychoanalysis has taught us much about the passions – sexuality, jealousy, envy, guilt and reparation; what has received less attention is the lack of passion; often mindless and empty states which certain passive clients present to us. At this practical seminar that would be relevant for psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Dr Alvarez uses the Internal Object and the Problem of Deficits to focus our attention on techniques that can potentially solve therapeutic impasse. She uses a vivid case vignette as an illustrative example to highlight how the effect of neglect or self-neglect is different from that of trauma. She helps us comprehend: Self-involved states: how do we get through? Internal object representations in such cases and how these can be our guide to therapeutic progress The technicalities of fostering development in light of the sense of agency Interpretations of the interestingness of internal objects Deficits and the issues of meaning and value When is a defensive strategy replaced by a sense of despair? How do we work with that? How do we distinguish between a passivity born out of lack of curiosity and lack of hope? Therapist responses in face of passivity the emergence of complex and nuanced narratives over the course of therapy The workshop links these understandings with case vignettes, thus illustrating the practical implications of our theoretical discussions. further details & bookings
Dealing with Obstacles in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: “What to do when you don’t seem to be helping” An evening webinar with Dr Gail Myhr Online, 8 February 2018, Thursday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time Therapists are often stymied by clients who don’t register progress, or whose presentation may worsen despite best efforts. The client who ruminates through-out the session despite therapist efforts to focus; the client who agrees cheerfully to every homework exercise, but never follows through; the client who says “yes, but..” to every therapist utterance - such clients can be difficult. They can evoke strong feelings in their therapists, who may find themselves questioning their approach / competence or their client’s motivation. This webinar presents a structured approach to dealing with impediments to progress in psychotherapy, with particular relevance for cognitive behavioural therapists. The webinar recognizes that barriers to progress can exist in the client, the client’s environment, and in the therapist. Client specific factors in stalled therapy can include their underlying beliefs, personality styles and habitual behaviours. Recognition of typical patterns of “resistance” (for example, “the victim role”) can tip off the therapist to more effective approaches for the client. Maladaptive beliefs on part of the therapist can equally contribute to therapeutic impasses, and can be addressed in an experiential fashion. Dr Myhr will use a case vignette to llustrate key points. Delegates will be encouraged to have a difficult case of their own in mind in order to participate in an interactive exercise that highlights how we can overcome therapeutic impasses. further details & bookings
Shame, Guilt and Sexuality A one-day workshop with Jan Hepburn and David Richard London, 9 February 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm Shame, Guilt and Sexuality are inextricably linked but remain frequently neglected areas for therapeutic exploration, despite their centrality in Freud’s original thinking. As therapists, the triad of shame, guilt and sexuality can present multiple challenges: We understand that the presence of persecutory guilt in our clients can be a considerable obstacle to internal change. While through the therapeutic process we can try to replace persecutory guilt by feelings that lead towards reparation; progress can be challenging and can often be thwarted if the client feels too worthless to be reprieved. Our therapeutic challenges are further exacerbated when guilt coexists with shame, although it may not be explicitly manifest. To make any therapeutic progress now, we need to overcome the fact that shame is more than a primitive precursor to guilt; for shame to exist there has to be a person. If the self has been depersonalised, there is essentially no one to feel shame. We can see shame and sexuality are intertwined: in very early developmental experiences, in the complexities and frequent pain of adolescent development, and equally in on-going adult development. However, particularly in adulthood, it may be extremely difficult for the individual to be able or willing to identity or articulate such shame; and hence within the therapeutic encounter it may remain a psychological state - hidden, repressed or indeed denied. At this practical and unique seminar, which would be particularly relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Jan McGregor Hepburn draws on her longstanding experience in social work management and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, while David Richards taps into his extensive experience of working with issues of identity and sexuality, and particularly with homosexual men and women. Together, they help us comprehend the elusive connections between shame, guilt and sexuality, helping us comprehend: How do we distinguish between feelings of remorse and wishes to make reparation, which are in the service of development, and persecutory guilt, which is experienced as crippling and pervasive but which cannot be mediated by forgiveness or reparation, and is sterile and anti-development How can we comprehend shame as a failure of the ego to reach a narcissistic ideal, an extremely painful psychic state likely to lead to repression and fear of exposure (including in the consulting room) As therapists, encountering shame in a client may lead to a powerful confrontation with our own sexuality and earlier developmental experience, and create a challenging process for both therapeutic process and relational contact – how do we recognize and work with such a confrontation The perceived malign shadow of homophobia and its potential to be internalised by the individual may lead to a particularly vicious experience of shame and a sense of personal worthlessness – how can we work with that in the consulting room? When childhood remnants of shame create therapeutic impasse – how do we persevere with therapeutic engagement? Jan and David will not only present material based on published evidence; but also, use group discussion and clinical case studies as part of the workshop. Participants are welcome to bring vignettes of clinical material that can be shared and discussed within the normal boundaries of confidentiality. further details & bookings
Therapeutic Applications of Attachment Theory An advanced-level 2-day training workshop with Dr Gwen Adshead Melbourne, Australia 16 and 17 February 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm on both days Equipped with a core understanding of Attachment Theory concepts, practitioners can assess a client’s Attachment representations. An effective incorporation of such assessments in our therapeutic approaches however requires a deeper comprehension of the clinical applications of Attachment Theory. At this practical and in-depth two day training course, that would be of value to psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors, health care professionals and psychiatrists, Dr Gwen Adshead draws on her long-standing psychodynamic and clinical experience to help us comprehend the development of Attachment bonds & Psychopathology (Day 1) and the Applications of Attachment Theory in clinical practice (Day 2). On Day 1 of the course, we review the building process of Attachment patterns, styles and representations; looking at supporting factors, the impact of traumatic events, the relationship with temperament and the rupture and repair of Attachment across the life span. We also look at the development of mentalization as it relates to the underlying Attachment representations and specifically consider parental mentalization; and the relevance of childhood attachment for adult attachments; especially in terms of care giving and care eliciting behavioural systems. We also start looking at connections with psychopathological manifestations as preparation for Day 2 of the course. Day 2 of the training course focusses on the applications of Day 1’s concepts for therapeutic processes. We compare and contrast the literature on mentalization led therapies and other therapeutic schools, while looking at the relevance of Attachment Classifications for therapeutic interactions, therapy as a ‘Strange Situation’, Attachment and Transference and the implications of ruptures in therapeutic attachments. The two day course uses theoretical discussions and case vignettes to explain the value and challenges of an Attachment led therapeutic approach and equips delegates with a deeper understanding of practical therapeutic applications. About the speaker Dr Gwen Adshead is a Forensic Psychiatrist and Psychotherapist. She trained at St George's Hospital, the Institute of Psychiatry and the Institute of Group Analysis. She is trained as a group therapist and a Mindfulness-based cognitive therapist and has also trained in Mentalisation-based therapy. She worked for nearly twenty years as a Consultant Forensic Psychotherapist at Broadmoor Hospital, running psychotherapeutic groups for offenders and working with staff around relational security and organisational dynamics. Gwen also has a Masters' Degree in Medical Law and Ethics; and has a research interest in moral reasoning, and how this links with 'bad' behaviour. Gwen has published a number of books and over 100 papers, book chapters and commissioned articles on forensic psychotherapy, ethics in psychiatry, and attachment theory as applied to medicine and forensic psychiatry. She is the co-editor of Clinical topics in Personality Disorder (with Dr Jay Sarkar) which was awarded first prize in the psychiatry Section of the BMA book awards 2013; and she also co-edited Personality Disorder: the Definitive Collection with Dr Caroline Jacob. She is the co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Forensic Psychiatry (2013) and the Oxford Handbook of Medical Psychotherapy (2016). She is also the co-editor of Munchausens’s Syndrome by Proxy: Current issues in Assessment, Treatment and Research. Gwen was visiting professor at Yale School of Psychiatry and Law in 2013; and also honoured with the President’s Medal for services to psychiatry that same year for her work on ethics in psychiatry. She was awarded an honorary doctorate by St George’s hospital in 2015; and was Gresham Professor of Psychiatry 2014-2017. She now works in a medium secure unit in Hampshire in a service for high risk offenders with personality disorder; and in a women’s prison. further details & bookings
Eventbrite - Therapeutic Applications of Attachment Theory
Somatic Therapy: Interventions to Enhance Embodiment in Trauma Treatment An evening webinar with Dr Arielle Schwartz Online, 22 February 2018, Thursday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time Somatic Therapy emphasizes body awareness as an essential part of psychotherapy. This is especially beneficial in the treatment of PTSD when symptoms involve physiological distress, affect dysregulation, or dissociation. Traditional approaches to therapy attend to the cognitive and emotional aspects of clients’ lives, while the somatic experience is often left out of the room. Our bodies need to process stressful and traumatic events through breath and movement. Unfortunately, we are often taught to sit still and override movement impulses. As a result, the biological effects of stressful or traumatic events tend to persist long after events have passed. “Talk therapy” can perpetuate this culture of stillness unless the therapist has the training and skills to integrate the body into psychotherapy. Interventions to enhance embodiment in trauma treatment expand the therapeutic experience beyond where words can take a client. In this engaging and informative webinar by Dr. Arielle Schwartz, we learn the science of embodiment and why somatic psychology is essential for helping clients work with dysregulated affect and arousal states that accompany PTSD. We discuss the key principles of modern day somatic psychology modalities including the value of working mindfully, relationally, and experientially. We will discuss the difference between “top-down” and “bottom-up” interventions and how they can be used to strengthen clients’ “window of tolerance.” We will also explore how somatic processing of traumatic events can be combined with other trauma treatment modalities (e.g. EMDR Therapy, Trauma Focused CBT, Narrative Exposure Therapy). The webinar will be especially useful for psychotherapists, psychologists and counsellors who are interested in learning how to integrate somatic psychology interventions into their work with clients. Specifically, we will consider: The theoretical and scientific bases of somatic psychology The cognitive, emotional, and physiological impact of stress, trauma, and PTSD Why working in the “Window of Tolerance” is essential to successful trauma treatment Examples of “top-down” and “bottom up” interventions in trauma treatment The importance of mutual regulation as a precursor to the development of self-regulation of affect and arousal Specific interventions to enhance embodiment in trauma treatment How somatic processing of traumatic events can be combined with other trauma treatment modalities (e.g. EMDR Therapy, Trauma Focused CBT, Narrative Exposure Therapy) further details & bookings
The Cost of Caring: Secondary Traumatic Stress and Practitioner Self-Care A one day seminar with Christiane Sanderson London, 23 February 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm Care provision and therapy for survivors of traumatic experiences, can inevitably be emotionally and physically draining. At each interaction, the practitioner is exposed to the risk of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) – which can potentially shatter our own assumptions about the world, human nature and the meaning of life and death. It is essential that through self-care and preservation of their own well-being, professionals ensure that they remain compassionate and are truly able to accompany the survivor on his or her journey to recovery. Current research indicates that vicarious traumatisation is just one part of STS. Direct exposure to emotionally distressing Trauma narratives can severely impact practitioners at multiple levels, with STS symptoms being close in presentation to those seen in PTSD. Therapists at the risk of STS may experience re-enactments of their own personal trauma, experience hyper / hypo arousal, suffer from alterations to memory and depletion of self-confidence. They may potentially develop mistrust of client interactions and exhibit avoidance behaviour. Needless to say, STS can impact us both personally and professionally. It is critical that practitioners in a wide range of mental and physical health settings have a good understanding of the impact and long-term effects of STS and how this manifests in a range of clinical settings, so that they are able to respond appropriately. This seminar, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, aims to enhance our comprehension of STS, its impact and long-term effects on our personal and professional well-being, while explaining how, as practitioners, we can work to restore vitality, enthusiasm, and energy in ourselves, to restore control and to allow for the effective processing of the Trauma narrative. Using illustrative case examples, the seminar will present a range of skills, experiential exercises and self-care strategies while helping us identify the first signs of STS. Specifically, we will consider: Differentiating between STS, Vicarious Trauma and Burnout The role and restoration of Compassion with a recognition of compassion fatigue Minimising the impact on our therapeutic relationships Who is at risk and are there specific forms of trauma with a higher correlation to STS? Assessment measures that can provide us with early warnings Identifying our own vulnerability to STS and ensuring we remain present and engaged in our work Striking the right balance between personal and professional lives – what does this mean for therapists? How do we ensure that we see clients with different presentations – does this really help? The impact of STS on individuals as well as organisations – can organisations take proactive steps to minimise such impact? Retaining our zest for life and assisting our clients with post traumatic growth further details & bookings
Dangerous Desires, Inanimate Containers: understanding the psychodynamics of substance misuse A one day seminar with Martin Weegmann London, 24 February 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm As therapists, whether we work directly with clients who misuse substances or face this challenge concomitant with other presentations, we realize that addiction as a defensive strategy is often too simple a generalisation. The underlying dynamics can be complex and difficult to comprehend – are we actually dealing with shame, guilt or resistance; attempts at management of self-esteem or avoidance of painful subjective states? Do we need to address substance misuse first before progressing with therapy and are we sufficiently equipped to do so? When is addiction simply a self-regulation failure and when does it step into the realm of a disorder? At this practical and interactive workshop that would be relevant for psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Martin Weegmann looks at substance misuse from a psychodynamic viewpoint and helps us: Consider an accessible, comprehensive and contemporary psychodynamic understanding of addiction, particularly relevant to the misuse of substances Link psychodynamic understanding with wider addictive mechanisms in society and the history of fear and fascination towards substances - whether normal(ised), legal or illicit Understand a framework for the process of recovery from substance misuse Comprehend what the concept of recovery means to the family and friends of those affected by a client’s substance misuse Consider how Attachment Theory (e.g. Phil Flores), the Self-medication Hypothesis (Edward Khantzian) and Self-psychology (Martin Weegmann) can conceptually help us work with substance misuse Appreciate how psychodynamic approaches are complementary to other mainstream approaches, including motivational enhancement, relapse prevention and Twelve-Step facilitation Consider the dynamics of lifestyle change following the achievement of abstinence Martin will not only present material based on published evidence; but also use group discussion and clinical case studies as part of the workshop. Participants are welcome to bring vignettes of clinical material that can be shared and discussed within the normal boundaries of confidentiality. further details & bookings
Attachment perspectives on Borderline Personality Disorder: implications for therapy A one-day workshop with Dr Gwen Adshead Sydney, Australia 24 February 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm Attachment theory provides useful perspectives on emotionally unstable or borderline personality disorder (BPD); both in terms of how the disorder develops and in terms of therapy. Both clients and therapists may struggle with trust, high levels of negative affect, and therapeutic ruptures. Attachment needs in such clients are highly aroused and often extremely difficult to assuage. Understandably, BPD clients can not only struggle to participate in the therapeutic alliance, but can also view therapists as aloof, uncaring, antagonistic or unsympathetic. At this practical and interactive workshop that would be relevant for psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Dr Gwen Adshead will use a perspective based on attachment theory and the tenets of mentalisation to explore: How the psychopathology of emotional instability develops Hostile, helpless states of mind and epistemic trust The relationship with disorganised attachment and its sequelae How this understanding informs our therapeutic approaches How this understanding influences the way we think about families and their therapeutic needs Language and threat: use of ‘why’ questions, silence and poor mentalising Preventing and managing attachment anxiety Gwen will not only present material based on published evidence; but also, use group discussion and ‘live supervision’ of cases brought by participants as part of the workshop. Participants are welcome to bring vignettes of clinical material that can be shared and discussed within the normal boundaries of confidentiality. About the speaker Dr Gwen Adshead is a Forensic Psychiatrist and Psychotherapist. She trained at St George's Hospital, the Institute of Psychiatry and the Institute of Group Analysis. She is trained as a group therapist and a Mindfulness-based cognitive therapist and has also trained in Mentalisation-based therapy. She worked for nearly twenty years as a Consultant Forensic Psychotherapist at Broadmoor Hospital, running psychotherapeutic groups for offenders and working with staff around relational security and organisational dynamics. Gwen also has a Masters' Degree in Medical Law and Ethics; and has a research interest in moral reasoning, and how this links with 'bad' behaviour. Gwen has published a number of books and over 100 papers, book chapters and commissioned articles on forensic psychotherapy, ethics in psychiatry, and attachment theory as applied to medicine and forensic psychiatry. She is the co-editor of Clinical topics in Personality Disorder (with Dr Jay Sarkar) which was awarded first prize in the psychiatry Section of the BMA book awards 2013; and she also co-edited Personality Disorder: the Definitive Collection with Dr Caroline Jacob. She is the co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Forensic Psychiatry (2013) and the Oxford Handbook of Medical Psychotherapy (2016). She is also the co-editor of Munchausens’s Syndrome by Proxy: Current issues in Assessment, Treatment and Research. Gwen was visiting professor at Yale School of Psychiatry and Law in 2013; and also honoured with the President’s Medal for services to psychiatry that same year for her work on ethics in psychiatry. She was awarded an honorary doctorate by St George’s hospital in 2015; and was Gresham Professor of Psychiatry 2014-2017. She now works in a medium secure unit in Hampshire in a service for high risk offenders with personality disorder; and in a women’s prison. further details & bookings
Eventbrite - Attachment perspectives on Borderline Personality Disorder: implications for therapy
Attachment-informed Psychotherapy: an integrative neuroscience-based model A one day workshop with Professor Jeremy Holmes London, 3 March 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm 21st Century psychotherapy is a practice in search of a theory. Despite competing and seemingly irreconcilable narratives and theoretical differences, empirical evidence suggests that the most potent agents of change are ‘common factors’, rather than specific theoretical techniques. Attachment Theory provides the evidence-base which helps to explain this. But what does attachment-informed therapy look like in the consulting room, and can its ideas and techniques be incorporated into existing models such as CBT, psychoanalytic, systemic and integrative therapies? At this practical and interactive workshop that would be relevant for psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Professor Holmes distils key features of Attachment Theory, viewing these through the lens of an integrative, neuroscientific model, to explore: affect regulation, sensitivity, and mentalising and their respective roles in psychotherapeutic practice neuroscientific implications of attachment and their therapeutic relevance using attachment ideas to foster resilience and tailor interventions to the degree of client disturbance how attachment-informed radical acceptance helps promote change in working with adults, children, couples and families the role of mentalising / ‘mind-mindedness’ in child development and in the therapist-client relationship; and the emergence of complex and nuanced narratives over the course of therapy The workshop includes a ‘live supervision’ session illustrating the practical implications of these theoretical discussions. further details & bookings
Couple Therapy: Dynamic Approaches for Working with Aggression A one day workshop with Susanna Abse London, 9 March 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm As couple therapists, we recognise that aggression, whether in its expressed or repressed form; is often at the heart of the difficulties that many couples bring to therapy. In some cases, the repression of anger and rage is the primary source of difficulties, while in other cases anger and rage seem to be the only ways in which intimate partners are being able to show and share feelings. At this practical and interactive workshop, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists and couple counsellors, Susanna Abse (former CEO of Tavistock Relationships), focusses on the key skills and mentalization-based therapy (MBT) techniques that can enable couple therapists to work effectively with aggression. She considers aggression in couples from a psychoanalytic viewpoint and helps us: Not be daunted by the levels of anger and abuse that some couples bring to the consulting room Learn how to contain and work with escalated levels of conflict between couples Understand how a comprehension of shared unconscious anxieties can help us orientate our interventions Explore unconscious barriers to the expression of ordinary aggression Understand how and why projective processes are employed to disavow anger and avoid conflict Explore the practitioner’s experiences of, and anxieties about working with aggression Find ways to support couples to manage their feelings better Understand the triggers that can lead to angry explosions of feelings Consider anger as the drive for autonomy and evaluate unconscious phantasies about aggression Explore and understand why and when verbal aggression may tip into physical violence Susanna will not only present material based on published evidence; but also, use group discussion and clinical case studies as part of the workshop. Participants are welcome to bring vignettes of clinical material that can be shared and discussed within the normal boundaries of confidentiality. further details & bookings
Body and Spirit in Contemporary Psychotherapy and Counselling: If Not Now, When? A one-day seminar with Professor Andrew Samuels and Nick Totton London, 10 March 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 5:00pm Regardless of our primary modality, a great part of our work as therapists and counsellors cannot progress without an awareness of embodiment. Similarly, the issues of meaning, purpose and alienation that many clients bring are very usefully understood with spirituality in mind. Apathy and depression, for example, can be considered from both embodied and spiritual perspectives. Relationships, too, carry our deepest experiences of soma and soul. So, can we re-frame the therapy relationship in embodied and in spiritual terms? At this practical and intellectually stimulating seminar, Andrew and Nick explore these two key themes that today’s therapists cannot ignore, yet often find challenging. Through coherent introductions, integrative thought and experiential exercises, they illustrate how body and spirit intertwine, each being reflected in the other: embodied spirit and spiritualised body (and other aspects of lived experience). The seminar helps us comprehend: The relationship between embodiment and spirituality: How the binary pair of ‘body’ and ‘spirit’ needs to be both respected and moved beyond How contemporary psychotherapy and counselling practice benefits from a systematic exploration of body and spirit How we can better understand a client’s distress by being attuned to bodily and spiritual questioning The role of body and spirit in relationships, with specific reference to the therapeutic alliance Transference and countertransference as reciprocal embodied experiences, originating in the matching of embodied-relational engrams The role of the spirit in intimate relationships including physical and sexual relationships The reliance of the co-created therapy relationship on the spirit of the client The shadow of spirituality and the shadow of embodiment - potentially negative and problematic elements that might be dangerous to ignore The concept of spirit as democratic, transparent and for the many instead of elitist, esoteric and only for the enlightened few Andrew and Nick also bring a third element to the body-spirit matrix – that of political and social awareness and sensibility within the clinical session. This implies a highlighting not only of gender and ethnicity (which therapists are more used to), but also of questions around environment and ecology, leadership and the economy. The seminar recognises that these are issues which touch our clients very deeply. Social injustice creates crises on both bodily and spiritual levels. Lastly, the seminar facilitates participants in contacting and exploring their own embodiment, and in deciding for themselves how this process relates to spiritual exploration. further details & bookings
Dialectical Behaviour Therapy: an introduction An evening webinar with Dr Alexander L. Chapman Online, 13 March 2018, Tuesday 5:00pm - 8:00pm, London, UK time Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) is a comprehensive, cognitive behavioural therapy, with demonstrated efficacy for complex presentations including borderline personality disorder (BPD). DBT includes individual therapy, group skills training, telephone or other forms (e.g., milieu coaching) of behavioural skills coaching, and a therapist consultation team. Based on the biosocial theory that BPD develops from a transaction of an emotionally vulnerable temperament and an invalidating rearing environment, the central focus of DBT is dealing with the difficulty of emotion regulation. Originally developed to help highly suicidal clients, DBT has accumulated considerable evidence for the treatment of BPD and related presentations including self-injury, suicidal behaviour, substance use problems and anger management concerns. Both the Australian National Health and Medical Resource Council and the UK’s National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health have concluded that DBT has the most evidence among current treatments for BPD. This webinar will introduce attendees to the theory and practice of DBT. Dr. Chapman will discuss the biosocial and dialectical theories underlying DBT, the structure of therapy, and some of the core intervention strategies, including the balancing of acceptance and change and skills for enhancing emotion regulation. The webinar will be especially useful for psychotherapists, psychologists and counsellors who are interested in learning more about DBT and whether they would like to incorporate DBT strategies or theory into their practice. Specific topics will include: The biosocial theory of BPD Dialectical theory and the balancing of core interventions in DBT An overview of the structure and format of DBT Specific skills and strategies to improve emotion regulation further details & bookings
The Revealing Image, 25 years on An Exploration of Trauma mediated through Jungian Analysis and Art Psychotherapy A one day workshop with Professor Joy Schaverien London, 16 March 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm The workshop starts with a discussion of theories first proposed in Joy Schaverien’s seminal work The Revealing Image: Analytical Art Psychotherapy in Theory and Practice. In the 25 years since its publication, this book has continued to be a core textbook for art psychotherapy and Jungian trainings in the UK and internationally. The book bridges a perceived gap between Jungian picture interpretation and art psychotherapy. In light of Joy’s work as a Jungian analyst, this day will consider ideas first elucidated in the book: diagrammatic and embodied images; the talisman and the scapegoat transference; and the distinction between symbols in pictures and artworks as symbolic objects The premise is that in working with trauma the artwork has a particular role in revealing, and so bringing into the light of consciousness, that which may otherwise remain unseen. The multiple gazes embodied in the artwork evoke aesthetic elements in the transference and countertransference; these include: the gaze of the picture, the gaze of the client/artist and the gaze of the therapist/viewer This day will offer a combination of theory, visual case studies, and a discussion of participant’s own practice. It will interest all therapists who use art in their clinical practice: Jungian analysts, psychotherapists and counsellors as well as art psychotherapists and creative therapists of different modalities. It will be of interest to those whose clients regularly use art materials and those who do so occasionally. Qualified art psychotherapists and trainees, familiar with the book may be interested to see how the theories developed in this influential text continue to be useful in Jungian analytic practice today. Learning objectives – to consider art within the analytic frame: The art work as integral within the transference Address the aesthetic elements of the transference and countertransference (when pictures are involved) How pictures reveal what cannot be spoken Sign and the symbolic impact of art in analysis Material objects in analysis further details & bookings
Time-limited Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with Adolescents and Young Adults (TAPP) A 2-day training workshop at London with Professor Stephen Briggs London, 16 & 17 March 2018, Friday and Saturday 9:30am - 5:00pm on both days In this practical and in-depth two-day course, that would be of value to psychotherapists, psychologists, health care professionals and CBT practitioners, Professor Stephen Briggs explains the time-limited approach of TAPP (Time-limited Adolescents and Young Adults Psychodynamic Psychotherapy) – a distinctive, brief (20 sessions), manualised, dynamic therapy model developed at Tavistock Clinic’s Adolescent Department. The model has been specifically developed for working therapeutically with young people across the child / adult divide (14 – 25 years). TAPP innovatively combines a psychodynamic approach with a psycho-social focus on the experiences of transitions in contemporary social contexts. It incorporates a problem solving approach through active client participation in contracting and reviewing. TAPP has the capacity to meet the needs of young people experiencing a wide range of difficulties during the adolescent and early adult years. Experience shows that the model is particularly relevant for young people who have Complex presentations of mental health diagnoses with psychosocial vulnerabilities Difficulties in relationships (including e.g. (self)destructive relationships and self-harm/suicidality) Anxieties and difficulties around separation Depression A need for second treatments An external time-limit Post-traumatic presentations To face transitions from children’s to adult services complex situations, where longer term treatment plans are not clear Drawing on his work at Tavistock Clinic and using a psychodynamic framework, Professor Briggs elucidates the therapeutic implications for practitioners working with young people; explaining in detail how we can recover a young person’s capacity to meet developmental challenges. The two day course uses theoretical discussions and case vignettes to explain the value and challenges of a time-limited approach. Course aims The course aims to provide a CPD training to enable practitioners to apply the elements of TAPP to their existing skills and knowledge so that they can use it in their own work settings. A CPD certificate for 12 CPD hours is provided at the end of the course. further details & bookings
Trauma, Attachment & Dissociation A one day workshop with Dr Valerie Sinason London, 17 March 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm The spectrum of dissociative responses to Trauma can range from coping mechanisms to pathological & non-pathological manifestations. As practitioners, not only do we need to understand the dissociation continuum; but also therapeutically work with the dissociative disorders that Trauma may trigger. In this practical seminar that would be of value to psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Dr Valerie Sinason helps us look at Trauma psychoanalytically while clearly understanding the variety of coping dissociative responses. Drawing on the latest research findings from neuroscience, Attachment research and clinical practice, Dr Sinason explains the key characteristics of dissociative disorders, in particular dissociative identity disorder (DID). Specifically, we consider: How does an Attachment informed conceptualisation help us comprehend the multiple facets of Trauma? Can our comprehension of dissociation (and DID) be applied when working with PTSD or Complex Trauma? If yes, what are the therapeutic challenges that we need to keep in mind? How can we comprehend Trauma through the lens of Attachment Patterns? We especially look at the aetiology of disorganised Attachment, which can be considered as pre-requisite for dissociation The Spectrum of Dissociation & DID: from a clinical standpoint, we aim to gain an understanding of: The dissociation continuum Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) Structural Dissociation models A Quaternary model for Dissociation Severe Trauma, Clinical Issues and Challenges: we look at intermediate and advanced concepts including the interaction between dissociative parts, apparently normal parts of personality (ANP) and secondary traumatisation. We also explore transference and countertransference challenges in working with cases of severe Trauma The seminar then builds on a well-founded theoretical base to discuss practical implications for clinical work, including effective assessment of DID. Theoretical constructs are explained throughout the workshop with the aid of examples from clinical work (with children and adults). Participants are welcome to bring vignettes of clinical material that can be shared and discussed within the normal boundaries of confidentiality. further details & bookings
Attachment Theory: An Integrationist Approach An interactive, evening discussion with Paul Renn (moderated by Jan McGregor Hepburn) London, 22 March 2018, Thursday 6:00pm - 9:00pm Research in the fields of Attachment, Developmental Psychology, Neurobiology and Cognitive Neuroscience are helping to deepen our understanding of the therapeutic relationship and the process of change. In this evening discussion, Paul Renn illustrates the way in which an integrationist perspective, with Attachment Theory at its core, may be applied to clinical work with adults. Drawing on research across Intersubjectivity, Trauma, Dissociation and Mentalization, while using a relational psychoanalytic approach, Paul highlights how practitioners can integrate the new findings from Attachment research and apply these to their therapeutic work. The discussion specifically explores Trauma from an Attachment and Neurobiological perspective while illustrating examples of ‘Attachment gone wrong’. About the speaker Paul Renn is a UKCP accredited psychoanalytic psychotherapist, training therapist and supervisor in private practice in London. He has a background in the National Probation Service where he specialized in working with violent individuals and couples. He subsequently trained at the Centre for Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, recently renamed the Bowlby Centre. Paul has presented papers at international conferences and devised and facilitated seminars and workshops on attachment and trauma, violent attachments, sexuality in the consulting room, memory, trauma and dissociation in psychotherapy, and the internal world and the process of change. He is the author of a number of book chapters and journal articles published in the UK and translated for publication abroad. He is a member of the Forum for Independent Psychotherapists, the International Attachment Network, the International Association for Forensic Psychotherapy, the Society for the Exploration of Psychotherapy Integration, and the International Association for Relational Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. He is on the editorial board of Psychoanalytic Inquiry and is the author of The Silent Past and the Invisible Present: Memory, Trauma, and Representation in Psychotherapy (Routledge, 2012). further details & bookings
Existential Therapy: An Introduction A one day seminar with Professor Mick Cooper London, 24 March 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm With roots that can be traced back to the existential work of Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche; Existential Therapy is a diverse, vibrant, and wonderfully rich tapestry of understandings and methods that has the potential to make a valuable contribution to the work of any counsellor, psychotherapist or psychologist. It is one of the oldest forms of therapy, and yet one of the most innovative and radical in its approach. Existential therapy is orientated around the development of a deep relational bond with clients, which allows clients to explore the most fundamental aspects of their existence. This includes questions like: ‘What is the meaning of my life?’ ‘What choices can I make?’ and ‘How do I face the limits of my circumstances?’ This workshop will introduce the existential approach to therapy, and focus on three particular aspects of existential work: Helping clients acknowledge their fundamental freedom and capacity to make choices Helping clients to face the givens of their lives, like death and the unattainability of perfect happiness Helping clients to find meaning and purpose in life The workshop will combine a mixture of personal development exercises, skills work, discussion and theoretical input. By the end of the workshop, participants will have developed a greater understanding of the existential approach, and will have developed ideas about how to incorporate existential understandings and methods into their own practice. further details & bookings
When Abuse leads to Complex Trauma and Complex PTSD: clinical challenges and therapeutic approaches A 2-day training workshop at London with Christiane Sanderson London, 27 & 28 April 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm on both days The repeated and systematic brutalisation seen in childhood sexual abuse, domestic violence and sexual exploitation can give rise to complex presentations that differ markedly from single-episode trauma. To effectively work with the clinical challenges in such presentations, as practitioners, we need to know therapeutic techniques that utilize both top-down and bottom-up processing; non-verbal approaches including art and play therapies; and sensorimotor techniques that enable survivors to live in the present rather than be catapulted into the traumatic past. At this practical and therapeutically oriented 2-day workshop, designed for counsellors, psychotherapists and psychologists, we specifically consider the complex presentations triggered by repetitive abuse and evaluate a range of therapeutic approaches, aimed at providing survivors with a path to recovery and post-traumatic growth. We start by looking at the range of trauma experiences and distinguishing between the current conceptualisation of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), subtype PTSD with prominent dissociative symptoms and Complex PTSD – evaluating the clinical challenges inherent in assessment, including misdiagnosis and comorbidity. Emphasis will be placed on the role of dissociation in complex trauma and how this gives rise to a number of dissociative challenges (including somatic symptom related disorders). In addition, we will specifically examine the nature of shame and traumatic bonding, considering how the trauma bond impacts our client’s sense of self and relational worth. The focus on day one will be in understanding the nature and dynamics of complex trauma and its impact on the individual. The challenges of assessing for complex trauma will be highlighted, while considering the development of collaborative case formulation. On Day 2 of the workshop, we will focus on best practice when working with survivors – through a phased treatment, trauma focused model which promotes stabilisation, processing and integration. We will observe how the trauma focussed model is enhanced when supported by a relational approach in which mutuality and connection are prioritised to create a collaborative and non-hierarchical therapeutic relationship. Our goal in considering these therapeutic techniques is to reduce the replication of power, control and shame dynamics that are often axiomatic in complex trauma. The co-creation and management of therapeutic impasse will also be considered – with a view to minimising shame and retraumatisation. Our learning objectives over the two days will include: Day 1: Explore the range of trauma and the nature of complex trauma, as triggered by recurring abuse Distinguish between PTSD, subtype PTSD with dissociative symptoms and complex PTSD Clinical challenges in the conceptualisation of PTSD including sub-syndromal PTSD and PTSD as a continuum The conceptualisation of complex PTSD in ICD-11 draft The role of dissociation in complex PTSD, the range of dissociative disorders and somatic symptoms related disorders The role of shame in complex trauma The challenges of co-morbidity and misdiagnosis The range of assessment scales Developing a collaborative case formulation Day 2: The fundamental principles of the trauma focused model which emphasises a phased treatment approach that promotes stabilisation, processing and integration The importance of adopting a relational approach The need for mutuality and connection to create a collaborative and non-hierarchical therapeutic relationship The manifestation and management of shame in the therapeutic space How to minimise the replication of power and control dynamics and re-traumatisation How to ‘be with’ rather than ‘do to’ The use of both top down and bottom up processing The value of non-verbal approaches such as art and play therapies, and sensorimotor techniques The co-creation and management of therapeutic impasse The role of practitioner’s own unprocessed material and dissociation in the therapeutic relationship The cost of caring as seen in vicarious traumatisation, burn-out, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress The importance of practitioner self-care Post traumatic growth further details & bookings
Working with Complex Trauma: A sequenced, relationship based approach An evening webinar with Christine A. Courtois, PhD, ABPP Author of 3 books on the treatment of complex trauma and one on spiritually-oriented psychotherapy for trauma Online, 3 May 2018, Thursday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time Complex Trauma, which is often the result of prolonged and repetitive trauma – presents multiple challenges for practitioners. The nature of trauma can be layered; there might be attachment trauma and / or childhood abuse which needs to be considered. The presentation itself may be nuanced and indeed complex – with after-effects spanning neurobiological, psychological, interpersonal and spiritual domains. The observable impact may be lifelong or only appear periodically in rather disguised forms. At this evening, online webinar, Dr Courtois provides an overview of after-effects, specifically considering the neurobiological and dissociative aspects of Complex Trauma. A sequenced, therapeutic approach that extends beyond the treatment of posttraumatic symptoms will be described. The webinar then discusses more trauma-focussed strategies which are geared towards trauma processing, resolution and integration, aimed at countering dissociative obstacles. Dr Courtois explains how our approaches need to be relationship oriented where the therapist provides a catalyst as well as a container for therapeutic issues. Since interpersonal trauma can also be viewed as an assault on the spirit of the victim, the webinar also suggests how we can pay attention to spiritual aspects as part of our therapeutic approach. Learning objectives: Comprehend and describe multiple dimensions of complex trauma Describe the after-effects and complexities of complex trauma Consider the spiritual impact of trauma Outline a sequenced therapeutic approach Identify several evidence-based and evidence-supported interventions for complex trauma therapy further details & bookings
Inter-parental Conflict and its Consequences: Breaking Cycles of Insecurity A one day seminar with Susanna Abse and Dr Christopher Clulow London, 4 May 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm Parental conflict, whether openly hostile or subtly discordant, has profound developmental implications. When faced with poorly resolved conflict between their parents, not only are children likely to experience stress, anxiety and emotional insecurity but also develop internal working models that affect their lives and relationships in adulthood. This one-day seminar enhances our understanding of each parenting partner’s internalised experience of conflict and how this shapes their own sense of security in adult and parent-child relationships. Drawing on research and intervention studies, and using attachment and object relations frameworks, the seminar considers implications for practitioners working therapeutically with individuals, couples and families. The seminar looks closely at the processes through which parental conflict can affect children and highlights ways of breaking negative intergenerational cycles. Specifically, we consider: The Evidence Base: what impacts parenting capacity and children’s attributions? We consider effective interventions and new areas of development Conflict, Divorce and Separation: we look at the impact on psychological processes and consider how mentalization based approaches can ameliorate post-separation conflict The Parental Couple in the Child: we consider the three pathways through which conflict between parents can affect children; the significance of the parental couple in transmission of attachment security and the developmental challenge of creating a triangular space The Child in the Parental Couple: we evaluate how couples are affected by becoming parents, consider the clinical challenges posed by parents in conflict and learn from successful intervention strategies further details & bookings
Challenges in Working with Attachment and Dependency in Complex Trauma A one day workshop with Kathy Steele London, 10 May 2018, Thursday 10:00am - 5:00pm While therapy for complex trauma often focuses on the integration of traumatic memories, an even more challenging problem is the profound relational distress of clients. This typically becomes a major difficulty in the therapeutic relationship itself. The client is unable to maintain a stable relationship with the therapist and subsequently experiences him or her as hostile, uncaring, or unhelpful, and sometimes even abusive, despite the best intentions of the therapist. Conflict ensues, and the therapist may unwittingly participate by becoming defensive and withholding or by appeasing the client. Designed to be of practical value to psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, this one-day workshop by Kathy Steele, focuses on an understanding of and an integrative approach to resolving attachment and dependency issues in clients with complex trauma. We will explore: the underlying evolutionary and biological origins of attachment in the face of threat, how these manifest in therapy and can serve as a basis of practical therapeutic approaches Dependency in the client, which will be discussed at length The reasons for intense dependency yearnings and specific ways to use the therapeutic relationship to contain and resolve this painful experience without overwhelming the client or the therapist A specific model of therapeutic relationship, with implications for therapy Our learning objectives at this workshop will include: Participants will be able to describe the basic underlying neurobiological and evolutionary foundations of attachment and dependency problems in complex trauma Participants will be able to employ at least five strategies to effectively manage dependency in therapy with complex trauma survivors Participants will be able to describe a specific model for the therapeutic relationship that can be effective in containing and treating relational difficulties in complex trauma The workshop includes discussions of case vignettes illustrating the practical implications of our theoretical discussions. further details & bookings
Working with PTSD & Complex PTSD from an Attachment Perspective A 2-day training workshop at London with Dr Felicity de Zulueta London, 11 & 12 May 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm on both days This practical workshop, led by Dr Felicity de Zulueta – one of UK’s leading experts on PTSD and complex PTSD – begins by discussing the latest diagnostic criteria for simple PTSD, and its dissociative manifestations, as they are presented in the new DSM V. The workshop highlights how these diagnostic criteria ignore the existence of a wide range of presentations that arise in survivors of childhood abuse and emotional neglect as well as those who have suffered from chronic and severe exposure to traumatic events, a condition unofficially referred to as ‘developmental PTSD’ and ‘complex PTSD’. Such a state of affairs can leave therapists treating these clients / patients with little or no guidance in relation to the aetiology, diagnosis, assessment and treatment of their symptoms and makes research in the field very difficult. Dr Zulueta demonstrates how an understanding of PTSD and complex PTSD from an attachment perspective, enables one to make sense of both the psychological and somatic symptoms clients / patients present with and the recent epigenetic findings relating to transmission of PTSD down the generations. By integrating her clinical experience with Attachment research, Dr Zulueta outlines the process by which psychotherapeutically trained practitioners can assess and prepare traumatised clients for the ‘journey of therapy’ whilst bearing in mind their need for emotional regulation and a sense of security. The workshop discusses different therapeutic approaches to stabilisation & treatment of PTSD and the way severe traumatic attachments can lead to resistance to change. Viewing the assessment and treatment of PTSD through the lens of Attachment Theory, the workshop helps practitioners understand how a rupture in the neurobiological capacity to attune and the capacity to mentalise is fundamental to our understanding of traumatised individuals, while also providing practical new approaches to therapy for both complex and developmental PTSD. Utilising a series of video vignettes and clinical case examples, Dr Zulueta helps us comprehend the linkages between PTSD, Borderline Personality Disorder, dissociative disorders and violent behaviour. Course aims The course aims to provide an integrative training approach that enables practitioners using different therapeutic modalities to integrate the relevant elements of Attachment Theory and Research with their existing skills, which they can then apply to their work with people suffering from Complex PTSD in particular. A CPD certificate for 10 CPD hours is provided at the end of the course. further details & bookings
Attachment Issues in Grief Therapy An evening webinar with Dr Phyllis Kosminsky and Dr John R. Jordan authors of Attachment Informed Grief Therapy: The Clinician’s Guide to Foundations and Applications Online, 17 May 2018, Thursday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time Attachment security is one of the very few factors that have been consistently identified by researchers seeking to understand the underlying causes of complicated vs. normal grief. In this webinar, Drs. Kosminsky and Jordan will look at what research and clinical practice have taught us about the development of a secure vs. insecure orientation to attachment, and how attachment orientation impacts emotional health across the lifespan, with an emphasis on response to loss. The presenters will explain the significance of contemporary perspectives on attachment and interpersonal neuroscience that are critical to understanding variations in peoples’ adaptation to loss, and will outline the implications of these insights for the practice of therapy with bereaved individuals. The core principles and practices of grief therapy have been consolidated in attachment informed grief therapy, an approach that emphasizes the centrality of the therapeutic relationship and the role of the therapist in helping the bereaved client re-regulate in the aftermath of significant loss. This approach is guided by an appreciation of the ways that attachment styles both mediate mourning and influence the therapeutic process. In order to understand how early attachment experience influences emotional and interpersonal functioning, Kosminsky and Jordan will begin by reviewing recent developments in neuroscience related to brain development and affect regulation. They will elaborate on the implications of these findings for our understanding of grief, particularly the phenomenon of complicated grief, and will demonstrate how contemporary neuroscience and modern attachment theory, in conjunction with new models of grief and loss, can help us make sense of a given individual’s grief response, their methods of coping with the strong emotions that accompany bereavement, and how they make use of grief therapy. Having established the basis and rationale of an attachment informed approach, the presenters will expand on the elements of grief therapy and the core clinical skills of the grief therapist that comprise this model. These principles and skills will be illustrated with clinical vignettes and client videos. This clinically orientated presentation, specifically explores: Our emerging understanding of the impact of early attachment experience on how people form relationships and how they manage strong emotions The significance of recent findings about attachment security as a factor in adaptation to loss Customising therapy to the client’s attachment orientation What it means to adopt an attachment informed approach to grief therapy, and the benefits of this approach for building a strong therapeutic alliance with bereaved clients further details & bookings
Postnatal Anxiety & Depression A one day seminar with Dr Stella Acquarone London, 19 May 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm A psychoanalytic understanding of the mother-baby dyad has particular relevance for practitioners. In this practical seminar that would be of value to psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Dr Stella Acquarone first demystifies the aetiology of post natal anxiety and depression; providing us with an understanding of contributing factors. This introduction leads to a discussion on therapeutic implications including effectively assessing and working with manifestations of severe anxiety, depression, mood swings, extreme stress and suicidal tendencies for mothers. The seminar then builds on our psychoanalytic understanding to discuss practical implications for clinical work including: What factors trigger the feeling ‘I have a beautiful baby but I just want to die’ Postnatal anxiety & depression: signs to look out for How can we distinguish between Postnatal anxiety and depression Triggering factors for both Differences in therapeutic interventions for postnatal anxiety and depression Post traumatic delivery & special needs Therapeutic interventions for cases of early child abuse With the aid of video vignettes and examples, Dr Acquarone explains how therapists can enhance their client’s capacity for consistent childcare and help them avoid the negative repercussions of poor coping strategies. further details & bookings
Embodied Relational Therapy: A new integrative modality A one day seminar with Nick Totton London, 8 June 2018, Friday 10:00am - 5:00pm Embodied-Relational Therapy (ERT) is an integrative, holistic approach focusing on two central facts about human beings: we are embodied and in relationship. To be alive, we need to be a body; to be alive, we need to relate to others - our greatest challenges and our greatest joys follow from these twin facts. As human beings, we integrate body-mind-spirit; and on the whole, we find this condition hard to manage. Our nature seeks to express itself freely, while at the same time protecting itself, in conditions sometimes of great difficulty. This double task of expression and protection makes us often subject to contradictory pulls, and offering double messages about what we feel, want and need. Through a relationship which is challenging but supportive and non-invasive, it is possible to disentangle our doubleness and allow our process to unfold. ERT offers a profound trust that whatever is trying to happen, in someone's life or in the wider world, needs to happen. The ERT approach cultivates a playful and spontaneous response to what we observe phenomenologically. It understands symptoms not as problems to be solved, but as a valuable stimulus to change and growth. ERT aims to support connection and integration between estranged aspects of ourselves, and between ourselves and the wider world – the communities of human and other-than-human beings. It thus has elements of both a political and a spiritual practice. This seminar combines a theoretical account of embodied relating, drawing on psychotherapy, neuroscience, philosophy, sociology and more, with a description of a style of clinical practice which embodies this theory. Participants can expect an enrichment of both their overview of therapy, and their clinical toolbag: many aspects of ERT can be integrated easily with other approaches and modalities. Among the topics to be addressed are: How to integrate attention to embodiment into verbally-oriented psychotherapy The reciprocity between embodiment and relationship Working creatively with issues of power and difference How to work with material without having to understand it first The role of a playful attitude in therapy Moving fluidly between different channels of experience – e.g. sensation, emotion, thought, relationship, fantasy, movement, external events (‘the world channel’) The concept of character and its value for therapy further details & bookings
Advanced Therapeutic Techniques using Attachment Theory A 2-day training workshop at London with Dr Gwen Adshead London, 15 & 16 June 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm on both days Equipped with a core understanding of Attachment Theory concepts, practitioners can assess a client’s Attachment representations. An effective incorporation of such assessments in our therapeutic approaches however requires a deeper comprehension of the clinical applications of Attachment Theory. At this practical and in-depth two day training course, that would be of value to psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors, health care professionals and psychiatrists, Dr Gwen Adshead draws on her long-standing psychodynamic and clinical experience to help us comprehend the development of Attachment bonds & Psychopathology (Day 1) and the Applications of Attachment Theory in clinical practice (Day 2). On Day 1 of the course, we review the building process of Attachment patterns, styles and representations; looking at supporting factors, the impact of traumatic events, the relationship with temperament and the rupture and repair of Attachment across the life span. We also look at the development of mentalization as it relates to the underlying Attachment representations and specifically consider parental mentalization; and the relevance of childhood attachment for adult attachments; especially in terms of care giving and care eliciting behavioural systems. We also start looking at connections with psychopathological manifestations as preparation for Day 2 of the course. Day 2 of the training course focusses on the applications of Day 1’s concepts for therapeutic processes. We compare and contrast the literature on mentalization led therapies and other therapeutic schools, while looking at the relevance of Attachment Classifications for therapeutic interactions, therapy as a ‘Strange Situation’, Attachment and Transference and the implications of ruptures in therapeutic attachments. The two day course uses theoretical discussions and case vignettes to explain the value and challenges of an Attachment led therapeutic approach and equips delegates with a deeper understanding of practical therapeutic applications. About the speaker Dr Gwen Adshead is a Forensic Psychiatrist and Psychotherapist. She trained at St George's Hospital, the Institute of Psychiatry and the Institute of Group Analysis. She is trained as a group therapist and a Mindfulness-based cognitive therapist and has also trained in Mentalisation-based therapy. She worked for nearly twenty years as a Consultant Forensic Psychotherapist at Broadmoor Hospital, running psychotherapeutic groups for offenders and working with staff around relational security and organisational dynamics. Gwen also has a Masters' Degree in Medical Law and Ethics; and has a research interest in moral reasoning, and how this links with 'bad' behaviour. Gwen has published a number of books and over 100 papers, book chapters and commissioned articles on forensic psychotherapy, ethics in psychiatry, and attachment theory as applied to medicine and forensic psychiatry. She is the co-editor of Clinical topics in Personality Disorder (with Dr Jay Sarkar) which was awarded first prize in the psychiatry Section of the BMA book awards 2013; and she also co-edited Personality Disorder: the Definitive Collection with Dr Caroline Jacob. She is the co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Forensic Psychiatry (2013) and the Oxford Handbook of Medical Psychotherapy (2016). She is also the co-editor of Munchausens’s Syndrome by Proxy: Current issues in Assessment, Treatment and Research. Gwen was visiting professor at Yale School of Psychiatry and Law in 2013; and also honoured with the President’s Medal for services to psychiatry that same year for her work on ethics in psychiatry. She was awarded an honorary doctorate by St George’s hospital in 2015; and was Gresham Professor of Psychiatry 2014-2017. She now works in a medium secure unit in Hampshire in a service for high risk offenders with personality disorder; and in a women’s prison. further details & bookings
Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors: Overcoming Self-Alienation A 2-day training workshop at London with Janina Fisher, PhD London, 21 & 22 September 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 5:00pm on both days Childhood abuse necessitates self-alienation: we must disown the humiliating ‘bad child’ and work harder to be the ‘good child’, acceptable to our attachment figures. In the end, we survive trauma at the cost of disowning and dissociating from our most wounded selves. While longing to feel safe and welcome, traumatized individuals find themselves in conflict: alternating between clinging and pushing others away, experiencing self-hatred or hostility toward others, yearning to be seen yet yearning to be invisible. Years later, these clients present in therapy with symptoms of anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, diagnoses of bipolar and borderline personality disorder, and a distorted or absent sense of identity. This two-day training workshop offers a practical, hands on approach to working with traumatized clients who experience self-alienation and self-hatred, by helping them to recognize how the trauma has left them fragmented and at war within their own minds and bodies. Participants will learn how to help their clients observe the parts they have embraced and identified with as ‘me’ as well as the trauma-related parts they have disowned and judged harshly. Using interventions drawn from a number of therapeutic approaches (including Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, Internal Family Systems, and Ego State Therapy), the focus is on helping clients observe and accept all aspects of the self with mindfulness-based interest and curiosity. As their young parts are identified and understood as ‘heroes’ in their own individual stories of survival, clients are able to feel more warmly toward them, often for the first time. Techniques will be demonstrated that increase the capacity to feel for, and with, each part; that foster a sense of caring, and that pave the way for growing 'earned secure attachment'. Even when our clients are unable to tolerate emotion, extend themselves compassion, or take in someone else’s caring, they can still learn to feel protective of their younger selves and even to welcome home these ‘lost souls’ with warmth and self-compassion. Learning Objectives To identify signs and symptoms of fragmentation and internal conflict To facilitate mindful tracking of fragmented parts of the self To decrease client phobias of emotion and inner experience by increasing mindfulness-based dual awareness To utilize somatic interventions for regulating autonomic arousal and affect dysregulation to calm the body To integrate interpersonal neurobiology and social engagement techniques into the treatment To increase self-compassion through growing empathy for wounded child parts To foster ‘earned secure attachment’ further details & bookings

nscience UK is an independent organisation that seeks to explore the interdisciplinary richness of mental health disciplines. Through a series of seminars, workshops and conferences that are conducted throughout the year, we aim to present the latest advances in theory and research to practitioners; with a view to furthering their continuing professional development.

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Continuing professional development through seminars, workshops and conferences for psychotherapists, counsellors and psychologists.