SEMINARS & WORKSHOPS in 2018
Annual Conference 2018 Working with Insecure and Disorganised Attachment London, 19th and 20th October 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm on both days As therapists, we witness the challenges of insecure and / or disorganised attachment patterns across a whole spectrum of presentations. Anxious-ambivalent clients may appear resistant to therapeutic approaches or persistently stay overwhelmed with feelings of helplessness. Anxious-avoidant clients meanwhile, may be extremely hard to assess – their lack of interest and ignoring stance masking their avoidance of close affective involvement. Perhaps most challenging is the disorganised pattern (and often the most controversial classification), where simultaneous approach-avoidance manifestations make distinction difficult with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). At our Annual Conference this year, we bring together some of the leading thinkers in the field to discuss practical therapeutic strategies that we can utilise in our work with insecure and disorganised attachments. Through lectures, case examples and panel discussions, we look at: Mentalisation-Based Therapy for BPD – the hurdles we face in light of insecure attachments Surprise and the relational brain: the neuroscience of working with insecure and disorganised attachments Insecure / Disorganised attachments and Intimate Relationships In-session silences and the therapeutic alliance Insecure attachments and Affect Regulation
Professor Peter Fonagy Peter Fonagy, OBE FMedSci FBA FAcSS PhD is Professor of Psychoanalysis and Developmental Science and Head of the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences at University College London; Chief Executive of the Anna Freud Centre, London; and holds visiting professorships at Yale and Harvard Medical Schools. His clinical interests centre on issues of early attachment relationships, social cognition, borderline personality disorder, antisocial behavior and violence. His longitudinal studies which linked the quality of parent-infant attachment to theory of mind development have important implications for strategies for early prevention not accounted for by genetic influences. The link between human attachment and social cognition led Bateman, Fonagy and colleagues to develop a model of and a highly effective treatment approach for borderline personality disorders (BPD). Mentalization Based Treatment (MBT) is now one of the two evidence-based psychological treatments used for severe PD and is widely practiced in the UK, Europe and the USA. Professor Jeremy Holmes Professor Jeremy Holmes MD FRCPsych BPC is a psychiatrist and psychoanalytic psychotherapist. For 35 years he worked as Consultant Psychiatrist and Psychotherapist in the NHS, focussing especially on people with Borderline Personality Disorder. He was Chair of the Psychotherapy Faculty of the Royal College of Psychiatrists 1998-2002. Now partially retired, he teaches on the Masters and Doctoral psychoanalytic psychotherapy training and research programme at Exeter University, where he is visiting Professor; and lectures nationally and internationally. He has written more than 200 peer-reviewed papers and chapters in the field of Attachment and Psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Dr Gwen Adshead Dr Gwen Adshead is a Forensic Psychiatrist and Psychotherapist. She trained at St George's Hospital, the Institute of Psychiatry and the Institute of Group Analysis. She is trained as a group therapist and a Mindfulness-based cognitive therapist and has also trained in Mentalisation-based therapy. She worked for nearly twenty years as a Consultant Forensic Psychotherapist at Broadmoor Hospital, running psychotherapeutic groups for offenders and working with staff around relational security and organisational dynamics. She is the co-editor of Clinical topics in Personality Disorder (with Dr Jay Sarkar) which was awarded first prize in the psychiatry Section of the BMA book awards 2013; and she also co-edited Personality Disorder: the Definitive Collection with Dr Caroline Jacob. She is the co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Forensic Psychiatry (2013) and the Oxford Handbook of Medical Psychotherapy (2016). She is also the co-editor of Munchausens’s Syndrome by Proxy: Current issues in Assessment, Treatment and Research.
Sarah Daniel Sarah Daniel is an internationally recognised researcher and author in the field of clinical psychology. Her research focuses on the process and outcome of psychotherapy with adults with a particular emphasis on the implications of adult attachment patterns. She holds a PhD degree in psychotherapy research from the University of Copenhagen and has worked in adult and child psychiatry for many years. She also worked as a full-time lecturer at the University of Copenhagen till 2017. Currently she works in full time private practice and is involved in attachment-oriented training of psychologists and other mental health professionals. She is the author of Adult Attachment Patterns in a Treatment Context: Relationship and Narrative (Routledge) and of several journal articles on attachment in a psychotherapy context; most recently Mind the Gap: In-session silences are associated with client attachment insecurity, therapeutic alliance, and treatment outcome (Psychotherapy Research). Dr Terence Nice Dr Terence Nice is Lecturer in Psychological Therapies in the Centre for Professional Practice at the University of Kent and a practicing Specialist Psychotherapist in the NHS. He is Chair of Ethics and trained as a psychoanalytic psychotherapist at the University of Kent before going onto the MA in infant observation at the Tavistock Clinic, London. Dr Nice has been fascinated by a developmental trajectory with regards to child, adolescent and adult self-harm and attempted suicide. Dr Nice is a member of the UKCP Research Faculty Committee and has chaired and co-chaired the second and third annual UKCP research conferences, respectively. He is a journal reviewer for the British Journal of Psychotherapy and the British Journal of Social Work Practice.
Dr Christopher Clulow Dr Christopher Clulow is a Consultant Couple Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist, registered with the British Psychoanalytic Council, and a Senior Fellow of the Tavistock Institute of Medical Psychology, London. He has published extensively on marriage, partnerships, parenthood and couple psychotherapy, most recently from an attachment perspective. His two edited books in this area are Adult attachment and couple psychotherapy: The ‘secure base’ in practice and research (2001, Brunner-Routledge) and Attachment, sex and couple psychotherapy: Psychoanalytic perspectives (2009, Karnac). His most recent co-authored book, Couple therapy for depression: A clinician’s guide to integrative practice, was published by Oxford University Press in 2014.
Conference Venue Regent's Conference Rooms, Regent's University London Inner Circle, London NW1 4NS
Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors: Overcoming Self-Alienation A 2-day training workshop at London with Janina Fisher, PhD London, 21 & 22 September 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 5:00pm on both days Childhood abuse necessitates self-alienation: we must disown the humiliating ‘bad child’ and work harder to be the ‘good child’, acceptable to our attachment figures. In the end, we survive trauma at the cost of disowning and dissociating from our most wounded selves. While longing to feel safe and welcome, traumatized individuals find themselves in conflict: alternating between clinging and pushing others away, experiencing self-hatred or hostility toward others, yearning to be seen yet yearning to be invisible. Years later, these clients present in therapy with symptoms of anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, diagnoses of bipolar and borderline personality disorder, and a distorted or absent sense of identity. This two-day training workshop offers a practical, hands on approach to working with traumatized clients who experience self-alienation and self-hatred, by helping them to recognize how the trauma has left them fragmented and at war within their own minds and bodies. Participants will learn how to help their clients observe the parts they have embraced and identified with as ‘me’ as well as the trauma-related parts they have disowned and judged harshly. Using interventions drawn from a number of therapeutic approaches (including Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, Internal Family Systems, and Ego State Therapy), the focus is on helping clients observe and accept all aspects of the self with mindfulness-based interest and curiosity. As their young parts are identified and understood as ‘heroes’ in their own individual stories of survival, clients are able to feel more warmly toward them, often for the first time. Techniques will be demonstrated that increase the capacity to feel for, and with, each part; that foster a sense of caring, and that pave the way for growing 'earned secure attachment'. Even when our clients are unable to tolerate emotion, extend themselves compassion, or take in someone else’s caring, they can still learn to feel protective of their younger selves and even to welcome home these ‘lost souls’ with warmth and self-compassion. Learning Objectives To identify signs and symptoms of fragmentation and internal conflict To facilitate mindful tracking of fragmented parts of the self To decrease client phobias of emotion and inner experience by increasing mindfulness-based dual awareness To utilize somatic interventions for regulating autonomic arousal and affect dysregulation to calm the body To integrate interpersonal neurobiology and social engagement techniques into the treatment To increase self-compassion through growing empathy for wounded child parts To foster ‘earned secure attachment’ further details & bookings
Sexual Harassment and Rape: The Role of Power and Control in Sexual Violence A one day workshop with Christiane Sanderson London, 6 October 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm This training day aims to explore the spectrum of sexual violence, in a contemporary context: from sexual intimidation to harassment, sexual abuse and rape. We examine how coercive control, and the abuse of power and authority manifest in sexual violence. Specifically, we identify the range of behaviours exhibited by perpetrators – especially how shame and complicity are used to ensure secrecy and silence. We explore how such psychological manipulation further serves to reduce disclosure and reporting of sexual violence – and how, as practitioners, we can support survivors in such a way that disclosure is facilitated without the risk of re-traumatisation and secondary stigmatisation. Throughout the training day, the range of sexual violence including male to female rape, female to male rape, male to male rape, female to female rape, transgender rape as well as rape and sexually harmful behaviour perpetrated by children will be considered. We will consider both the short term and long-term impact of sexual violence for survivors; within the context of a trauma framework. Overall, the workshop aims to: Enhance our awareness and understanding of the nature and dynamics of rape and sexual violence Equip professionals and practitioners with the skills to help restore self-worth and control to survivors Allow us to assist our clients in reclaiming their voice without the fear of being stigmatised and / or pathologized; so that they can recover and heal The workshop combines case studies and relevant theory to specifically consider: When does flirting and banter become sexual harassment The range of sexual violence The role of power and control in sexual violence The use of charm and grooming for exertion of coercive control The use of shame and complicity in ensuring silence and secrecy Barriers to disclosure and how these can be overcome The risk of stigmatisation and re-traumatisation by others such as family and friends, the media and the criminal justice system The impact and long-term effects of sexual violence and rape The importance of contextualising sexual violence and rape within a trauma framework Minimising re-traumatisation and secondary stigmatisation further details & bookings
The Well-Resourced Therapist: Preventing burnout and vicarious trauma A one day workshop with Miriam Taylor London, 12 October 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm Fundamental to our therapeutic work with Trauma is our awareness and active control of vicarious traumatization; empathic engagement with the Trauma narrative can otherwise leave us emotionally drained and professionally ineffective. It is vital for our clients and our own self-care that the process of counter-transferential traumatisation is not just well recognised by us but also prevented proactively, ethically and responsibly. At this practical workshop which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Miriam draws upon her longstanding experience in specialist trauma services and her somatically informed, relational approach to therapy, as she explains: The evidence offered by neuroscientific research for vicarious traumatisation and how this can be utilised in a preventive manner The resources that are available to us, as therapists, through which we can not only enhance our resilience but also bear witness to the trauma narrative without dissociating or allowing ourselves to be pulled into the trauma contagion Paying close attention to our own history of trauma and caretaking and the impact these can potentially have on the therapeutic relationship Building our own somatic awareness and that of our clients with a view to enhancing safety, grounding and resilience Applying reflective practice for mutual healing How we can rethink our traditional theoretical models from a relational standpoint, so as to best prevent occupational burnout Utilising clinical vignettes that illustrate the key dilemmas faced by therapists, together with relational and somatic examples, the workshop allows us to reflect on our therapeutic approaches while highlighting the most effective methods for building and sustaining resilient, relational containers. further details & bookings
Time-limited Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with Adults, Children, Parents and Young People: An Introduction A one day workshop with Dr Ruth Schmidt Neven London, 13 October 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm At this workshop, which is designed to be of practical value to psychotherapists, psychologists, psychiatrists and family mental health practitioners working with adults as well as children, adolescents and parents; Dr Ruth Schmidt Neven draws on evidence base to refute the stereotype that psychodynamic psychotherapy is solely synonymous with long-term therapy. Using a time-limited conceptual therapeutic framework, Dr Neven emphasises how we can enhance the dynamic capacity for growth and change, instead of focussing on the underlying psychopathology. Such a shift of focus can: In our work with adults, children and young people – allow us to view the presenting symptoms as opportunities that enable us to understand how adults speak their history and how children and young people speak their family Help us retain focus on finding capacity in our clients with a view to recalibrating the presenting manifestations Allow us to enable a change in parents’ perspective of themselves, which is an essential prerequisite for enduring therapeutic outcomes with young clients Help us to attend simultaneously to the three inter-connected domains of the intra-psychic, the interpersonal and the systemic, within the therapeutic process The workshop is divided into two parts – we first discuss clinical work with adults and then discuss clinical work with children, parents and adolescents. The workshop is not intended to provide a manualised programme but rather to describe a set of core principles and a conceptual framework for the practice of time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy. This broader approach enables us to encompass the ‘total field’ that surrounds the client, thereby promoting positive change within a relatively short period of time. Through illustrative case vignettes and examples from her clinical work in UK & Australia, Dr Ruth Schmidt Neven helps both new practitioners and those with many years of experience to comprehend a time limited framework, enabling us to: Understand the assessment process – from hypothesis to formulation Create change within a time-limited format Develop therapeutic communication in such a way that the primacy of the therapeutic encounter stays in focus Manage beginnings, endings and returns Apply the core principles of a time-limited psychodynamic approach in a practical manner to our clinical work further details & bookings
Helping Challenging Trauma Clients to Open Up An evening webinar with Dr Robert T. Muller Online, 23 October 2018, Tuesday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time Dr Robert T. Muller is the globally-acclaimed author of the psychotherapy bestseller, Trauma & the Avoidant Client, as well as the newly-released, Trauma & the Struggle to Open Up; and his latest webinar is aimed at building our understanding of psychotherapy with challenging trauma clients—in particular, how to help such individuals open up. When people live through interpersonal trauma, there is a tendency for many to stay silent about their experiences. Reasons include loyalty to close others, or the wish to keep family secrets. To cope, survivors often sidestep the painful past. As a means of protecting close others and themselves from the pain of traumatic experiences, many rely on a variety of coping strategies to neutralize or cut-off painful memories. For example, they rationalize away traumatic events, use intellectualization as a defense, dissociate and keep trauma-related feelings at bay. But silence about the painful past is both emotionally costly, and, ultimately unsustainable. How do we help people feel safe enough to start opening up about their traumatic histories? In this webinar, Dr. Muller will look at the process of helping challenging trauma clients open up—to do so in a safe, measured way. How do we create conditions for a shared, honest, and growthful telling? How do we use the therapeutic relationship as a key ingredient in the process? Why is pacing so critical, and how do we put pacing into practice? Using a relational, Attachment Theory based integrative approach, Dr. Muller draws on theory and uses case examples, practical exercises, and segments from his own treatment sessions. This webinar focuses on clinical skills that are directly applicable in our work as therapists. Learning Objectives: This webinar provides integrative training to help practitioners from different therapeutic modalities. Skills are practical and highly applicable. Participants learn how to: Bring safety to the therapeutic relationship early on Recognize client ambivalence about their trauma stories Help clients pace the process of opening up Recognize therapist feelings in therapy (e.g., the wish to rush into trauma work, or the wish to avoid it) Help clients move beyond the trauma, to consolidate changes in identity and facilitate posttraumatic growth Note: This webinar draws on clinical material from Dr. Muller's new psychotherapy book: Trauma & the Struggle to Open Up: From Avoidance to Recovery & Growth, Norton Press, 2018. The book complements the webinar, providing material for attendees to further their learning. further details & bookings
The Psychophysiology of PTSD and Trauma: how we can make Trauma Therapy safer A 2-day workshop at London with Babette Rothschild London, 31 October and 1 November 2018, Wednesday and Thursday 10:00am - 4:00pm on both days PTSD can be viewed as a condition where the body and mind have not, yet, recognized that a traumatic event is over. The body’s nervous system continues to mobilise for defensive fight / flight or protective freeze. At the same time, PTSD can be seen as a failure of mindful dual awareness, which results in over reliance on, and hypervigilance for internal cues and symptoms and an inability to recognise the present as different from the past. This practical, two day workshop which would be relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists and social workers is aimed at equipping delegates with neurophysical and psychophysical theory, principles and tools – which allow us in our therapeutic interactions to help our clients: Enable the nervous system to recognise when trauma is over; by understanding, reducing, containing and halting traumatic hyperarousal, including flashbacks and benefit from body-oriented interventions that assist in integrating traumatic memories, with a view to increasing stability and improving quality of life Through case-vignettes and examples, delegates will learn to: distinguish between clients who will benefit from the processing of traumatic memories and clients who will not – we consider specific therapeutic skills for helping both groups comprehend the structure of the body’s nervous system and understand how we can employ the sensory nervous system for mediating flashbacks and nightmares effectively utilise the autonomic nervous system for moderating arousal levels Discern relaxed (muscular states) from calm (nervous system states) Incorporate mindfulness, yoga and physical exercises in our therapeutic approach Clearly delineate between traumatic stress, post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic stress disorder Gain tools for protecting ourselves from vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue The workshop is consistent with and would be a beneficial adjunct to multiple modalities of psychotherapy or specialised trauma therapy (including analytical, dynamic and somatic approaches, cognitive behavioural and EMDR). Participants will each receive a laminated version of the new 6-colour ANS table to keep and continue to use in their work and for their own self-care. further details & bookings
The Relationship is Your Most Powerful Tool (& Biggest Pitfall): Relational Strategies to Effectively Treat Challenging Trauma Clients A 2-day training workshop at London with Dr Robert T. Muller London, 9 & 10 November 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 5:00pm on both days Note: Workshop registrations include a complimentary copy of Dr. Muller's new book: Trauma & the Struggle to Open Up: From Avoidance to Recovery & Growth. The book complements the workshop, providing material for attendees to further their learning. This practical workshop, led by Dr Robert T. Muller—a leading expert on therapy for Trauma and globally-acclaimed author of the psychotherapy bestseller: Trauma & the Avoidant Client - is aimed at building our understanding of the psychotherapy relationship with challenging trauma clients. As therapists, while all of us try to maintain a strong and healthy therapeutic relationship, this can be often easier said than done. Trauma clients struggle to trust the therapist; many minimize their own traumatic experiences or become help-rejecting. Others rush into the work, seeking a “quick fix,” despite a long history of interpersonal trauma. Drawing upon attachment theory and research, and upon a wealth of clinical experience, Dr Muller explains how, as psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, we can work with such hard-to-treat clients, how we can find points of entry and ways in which we can make contact. Using a relational, psychodynamic approach, the workshop discusses and demonstrates strategies for developing the therapeutic relationship, such that we can assist the client regain a sense of trust in others. We explore therapeutic techniques through which the client is encouraged to take interpersonal risks, to mourn losses, and to face vulnerabilities. Dr Muller follows the ups and downs of the therapy relationship with trauma survivors and specifically looks at: How do we tell when we’ve unknowingly compromised safety in the relationship? What happens to the relationship when clients or therapists rush into the process, and how can this be addressed? And how can subtle conflicts in the relationship become useful in treatment? Dr Muller points to the different choices therapists make in navigating the relationship – choices, that often have a strong impact on outcome. The workshop also acknowledges that recovery from Trauma is a deceptively complicated process. When clients reveal too much, too soon, they may feel worse – making the pacing of therapy critical. Here too, the key is in the therapist-client relationship. Dr Muller walks us through the relational approaches that help pace the process of opening up –so that clients find the experience helpful, not harmful. Throughout the workshop, theory is complemented by case examples, practical exercises, and segments from Dr Muller's own treatment sessions. The workshop focuses on clinical skills that are directly applicable in our work as therapists. further details & bookings
The Relationship is Your Most Powerful Tool (& Biggest Pitfall): Relational Strategies to Effectively Treat Challenging Trauma Clients A 2-day training workshop at London with Dr Robert T. Muller Dublin, 12 & 13 November 2018, Monday and Tuesday 10:00am - 5:00pm on both days Note: Workshop registrations include a complimentary copy of Dr. Muller's new book: Trauma & the Struggle to Open Up: From Avoidance to Recovery & Growth. The book complements the workshop, providing material for attendees to further their learning. This practical workshop, led by Dr Robert T. Muller—a leading expert on therapy for Trauma and globally-acclaimed author of the psychotherapy bestseller: Trauma & the Avoidant Client - is aimed at building our understanding of the psychotherapy relationship with challenging trauma clients. As therapists, while all of us try to maintain a strong and healthy therapeutic relationship, this can be often easier said than done. Trauma clients struggle to trust the therapist; many minimize their own traumatic experiences or become help-rejecting. Others rush into the work, seeking a “quick fix,” despite a long history of interpersonal trauma. Drawing upon attachment theory and research, and upon a wealth of clinical experience, Dr Muller explains how, as psychotherapists, psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, we can work with such hard-to-treat clients, how we can find points of entry and ways in which we can make contact. Using a relational, psychodynamic approach, the workshop discusses and demonstrates strategies for developing the therapeutic relationship, such that we can assist the client regain a sense of trust in others. We explore therapeutic techniques through which the client is encouraged to take interpersonal risks, to mourn losses, and to face vulnerabilities. Dr Muller follows the ups and downs of the therapy relationship with trauma survivors and specifically looks at: How do we tell when we’ve unknowingly compromised safety in the relationship? What happens to the relationship when clients or therapists rush into the process, and how can this be addressed? And how can subtle conflicts in the relationship become useful in treatment? Dr Muller points to the different choices therapists make in navigating the relationship – choices, that often have a strong impact on outcome. The workshop also acknowledges that recovery from Trauma is a deceptively complicated process. When clients reveal too much, too soon, they may feel worse – making the pacing of therapy critical. Here too, the key is in the therapist-client relationship. Dr Muller walks us through the relational approaches that help pace the process of opening up –so that clients find the experience helpful, not harmful. Throughout the workshop, theory is complemented by case examples, practical exercises, and segments from Dr Muller's own treatment sessions. The workshop focuses on clinical skills that are directly applicable in our work as therapists. further details & bookings
The Narcissistic Dilemma: A Perspective from Relational and Integrative Psychotherapy A 2-day training workshop at London with Dr Richard G. Erskine London, 16 & 17 November 2018, Friday and Saturday 10:00am - 5:00pm on both days The challenges of working with narcissistic manifestations are many and varied. The psychotherapy of narcissistic dynamics for example, often revolves around the client’s relational dilemma – whether ‘to need or not to need’. This dilemma results in behavioural characteristics of extreme self-involvement, grandiosity, an absence of empathy and a lack of interest in others, even while others are being used to obtain approval and admiration. The Narcissistic process may be based on a client’s low self-esteem and incessant hunger for validation, which is often masked by excessively intense pseudo-vitality. Similarly, a client who presents as timid, ineffective and powerless may actually have a split-off image that is grandiose, powerful and erotic. How do we work effectively with such presentations? The dynamics of transference meanwhile add to our challenges: We may have a client who sees himself or herself as all-important and requires us, as therapists, to reflect-back that importance, or We may have a client who wants to be in the presence of someone powerful, or The client may want to do, or even to be, the same as the other person, or Our client may be defining himself or herself through criticism, dissension or antagonism At this workshop, we first distinguish between a narcissistic style, pattern and a personality disorder. We also discuss the closet narcissist – the client who is covertly self-centred while acting shy, timid and ineffective. Using case studies and examples, Dr Erskine explains the aetiology, intra-psychic conflicts and the relational methods necessary in an effective psychotherapy of clients with narcissistic manifestations. Drawing on object relations and integrative approaches, we look at four transferential processes in detail, considering the practical implications for therapy in each case: Mirroring Transference Idealizing Transference Twinship Transference and Adversarial Transference We then consider the role of narcissistic fantasies and evaluate how such fantasies constitute Narcissistic-Moments that may be filled with a lot of emotional energy. The workshop explains the implications for therapeutic interactions, in light of such narcissistic dynamics, processes and fantasies – with a view to explaining how a therapeutic cure may not be attributable to insight or interpretation, but instead, to the quality of involvement that emphatically responds to both the client’s current and archaic relational needs. further details & bookings
Attachment, Complex Trauma and Personality Disorders A one day workshop with Dr Gwen Adshead London, 23 November 2018, Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm Attachment relationships provide the foundations and the context within which individuals build their key developmental skills, including distress tolerance and a sense of agency. Exposure to repeated and / or early onset emotional, sexual and physical abuse has the potential to rupture these relationships – placing individuals on a developmental trajectory that is risk prone for additional trauma and cumulative impairment (manifest on the personality disorder spectrum from a diagnostic criteria perspective). The challenge for us, as therapists is that diagnostic classification (for example as PTSD) does not fully capture the developmental and relational effects of complex trauma exposure. Research has shown that psychological impact can reach across multiple domains including attachment, affect regulation and behavioural regulation. At this practical, engaging and therapeutically focussed workshop, Dr Gwen Adshead draws on her extensive hands-on experience in working with clients who have complex needs, to specifically address the clinical challenges associated with complex trauma. Through case vignettes and examples, she explains the developmental pathways that we need to focus on for: a) Arousal modulation b) Regulation of emotions without external assistance c) Heightened care-seeking and dependency The workshop explains how the experience of multiple, chronic and prolonged, developmentally adverse traumatic events can interfere with our clients’ capacity to integrate sensory, emotional and cognitive information into a cohesive whole. We specifically consider the manifestation of so-called ‘complex needs’ and the skill deficits that can lead to symptomatology for personality disorders. The workshop brings together contemporary research and theory about attachment and complex developmental trauma, with a view to informing our therapeutic approaches. We work through practical examples to elucidate common challenges such as forming a therapeutic alliance, managing boundaries and working with re-enactments, when working with complex trauma. further details & bookings
The Trauma Counsellor's Toolbox: Exercises to Aid Recovery and Healing from Complex Trauma A one day workshop with Christiane Sanderson London, 24 November 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm Complex trauma is often the result of persistent, repetitive traumatic experiences which may include multiple violations such as sexual abuse, physical violence, emotional abuse and neglect – in many cases at the hands of someone known to the victim. This cycle, where trust is repeatedly betrayed can manifest in a range of symptoms such as dissociation, alterations to sense-of-self and fear of intimacy in relationships. Working with survivors of such trauma requires a range of therapeutic techniques that involve both top-down and bottom-up processing. This is particularly the case when trauma has been split off and is not easily accessible through verbal recall. Moreover, as complex trauma is primarily stored in the right brain, practitioners need to be able to facilitate right brain engagement through a selection of creative techniques and exercises. This training workshop, which would be especially relevant for counsellors, psychotherapists and psychologists, across modalities – provides an opportunity for professionals working with survivors of complex trauma to add practical skills to their therapeutic repertoire. The aim is to enable practitioners to explore more creative ways of working with complex trauma and help them become more embodied, so they can facilitate post-traumatic growth for their clients. The workshop achieves this through a series of experiential exercises including: working with nesting dolls, soft toys and transitional objects, exploring family constellations using peg dolls and animals, modelling the trauma narrative with playdoh, making masks to explore the hidden faces of shame and sand tray work to access the unspeakable aspects of trauma. The workshop combines experiential aspects with grounding skills and relevant theory to specifically consider: Ensuring safety and control: we look at appropriate usages of anchors, oases and safe places; exercises that enable clients to be present, reflect and relax Skills that improve daily routine for clients: improving sleep, making the bedroom safe and regaining contact with the body Grounding skills: identifying triggers, managing hyper and hypo arousal states, sensory connections Skills for managing flashbacks, nightmares and anxiety: handling internal dialogue, gaining control over flashbacks, recording nightmares and the protocol for panic attacks Getting rid of negativity: mental filtering and reappraisal of thoughts Working with memory fragments: reducing over-processing, pacing memory work and recording memories Managing boundaries: understanding collapsed or rigid boundaries and drawing the optimal personal space further details & bookings
A Comprehensive, Mind-Body Approach to Treating Clients with Chronic, Repeated, and/or Developmental Trauma An evening webinar with Dr Arielle Schwartz Online, 29 November 2018, Thursday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time Most of us, as mental health practitioners are trained in therapy for single traumatic events. However, clients with complex PTSD (C-PTSD) come to therapy with an extensive history of trauma that often begins in childhood and continues into adulthood with layers of personal, relational, societal, and / or cultural losses. It takes tremendous courage for a client to confront such traumatic memories and emotions. Successful therapy thus, requires a compassionate therapeutic relationship and effective, research-based interventions. At this engaging and interactive seminar, Dr Arielle Schwartz shares valuable leading-edge strategies that allow us to successfully address the dysregulated affect and arousal states that accompany C-PTSD. She explains practical tools that facilitate a strength-based approach to trauma recovery and increased resilience in our clients. The most common question asked by therapists working with C-PTSD is, “where do I start?” At this online training, we develop confidence in our ability to successfully organize and prioritize our client’s therapeutic goals. We also learn how to compassionately and effectively work with clients who have experienced multiple traumatic events and prolonged trauma exposure. The webinar will be especially useful for psychotherapists, psychologists and counsellors who are interested in learning how to integrate somatic psychology interventions into their work with clients. We will learn how to: Identify contributing factors to the development of Complex PTSD Explore how Complex PTSD impacts the cognitive, emotional, and physical health of the client Recognize differential diagnosis of Complex PTSD as related to other diagnoses such as personality disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and dissociative disorders Recognize how working within the “window of tolerance” can help reduce the likelihood of re-traumatization Define and describe top-down and bottom-up interventions in psychotherapy Discuss an integrative model for the treatment of C-PTSD drawn from DBT, EMDR Therapy, Parts Work Therapy, Somatic Psychology, and mind-body therapies further details & bookings
Attachment-informed Psychotherapy: an integrative neuroscience-based model A one day workshop with Professor Jeremy Holmes Melbourne, Australia, 1 December 2018, Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm 21st Century psychotherapy is a practice in search of a theory. Despite competing and seemingly irreconcilable narratives and theoretical differences, empirical evidence suggests that the most potent agents of change are ‘common factors’, rather than specific theoretical techniques. Attachment Theory provides the evidence-base which helps to explain this. But what does attachment-informed therapy look like in the consulting room, and can its ideas and techniques be incorporated into existing models such as CBT, psychoanalytic, systemic and integrative therapies? At this practical and interactive workshop that would be relevant for psychotherapists, clinical psychologists, counsellors and psychiatrists, Professor Holmes distils key features of Attachment Theory, viewing these through the lens of an integrative, neuroscientific model, to explore: affect regulation, sensitivity, and mentalising and their respective roles in psychotherapeutic practice neuroscientific implications of attachment and their therapeutic relevance using attachment ideas to foster resilience and tailor interventions to the degree of client disturbance how attachment-informed radical acceptance helps promote change in working with adults, children, couples and families the role of mentalising / ‘mind-mindedness’ in child development and in the therapist-client relationship; and the emergence of complex and nuanced narratives over the course of therapy The workshop includes a ‘live supervision’ session illustrating the practical implications of these theoretical discussions. further details & bookings
Introduction to Expressive Arts Therapy: Solutions for Trauma-Focused Care An evening webinar with Dr Jamie Marich Online, 5 December 2018, Wednesday 6:00pm - 9:00pm, London, UK time Expressive Arts Therapy is based on the assumption that our clients can recover from trauma and / or addictions, through the process of creative expression. Defined by its emphasis on the multi-modal process of healing (exploring many combinations of creative expression, rather than relying on just one art form), the approach conceptually incorporates learnings from Jungian, person-centered and Gestalt psychotherapies – while practically providing therapeutic techniques to trauma therapists and addiction specialists. At this engaging and practically oriented online workshop with Dr Jamie Marich, our learning objectives are: Describe the origins of expressive arts therapy (e.g., indigenous traditions, historical threads in Jungian analysis, person-centered psychotherapy, and Gestalt psychotherapy) Define expressive arts therapy and explain its nature as a multi-modal, multi-art process Explain the concept of grounding and why teaching it to clients is relevant in trauma-focused care Implement an expressive arts process to teach grounding in a clinical setting (individual or group), using at least three creative art forms further details & bookings

nscience UK is an independent organisation that seeks to explore the interdisciplinary richness of mental health disciplines. Through a series of seminars, workshops and conferences that are conducted throughout the year, we aim to present the latest advances in theory and research to practitioners; with a view to furthering their continuing professional development.

Disclaimer: Individuals pictured are either conference speakers or models. All images are used for illustrative purposes only.

Continuing professional development through seminars, workshops and conferences for psychotherapists, counsellors and psychologists.